Sign up for free

"Shoot has BEST Plant Database and Community on the Web."

– John Connel , Camberley


Tree Advice

In progress indicator
Full size image

Question from Sheron

Close

House rules are loading...

In progress indicator

We are processing your monitoring request...

In progress indicator

In progress indicator

Comment on a listing

Comment on a listing

Comment on a listing

Cancel and close this form

Until recently a 40 year old beech hedge marked the boundary between my garden and my neighbours. Some of the plants were in my neighbours' garden and some in ours. Unfortunately, my neighbour has chopped all of his down, along with several conifers. This means I've lost the backdrop to many plants and gained a gap of around 12 ft near the house and another of around 10 ft about 20 metres away. Of course, I could replace the wire link fence with a 6 ft wooden one to retain privacy, but I would rather use this as a planting opportunity and do not wish to reinstate hedge. I would like to plant a tree in each gap with possibly shrubs and perennials underneath. I realise the trees will cast shade onto the garden but I feel the added interest will make up for it. Although I know quite a bit about plants I'm always scared to make a decision when it comes to trees. Will they get too big or wide for my long, narrow garden? Will they cast too much shade? For the 12 ft gap near the house, where the remaining beech hedge is purple, I'm considering Liquidambar styraciflua or Pyrus calleryana "chanticlear". I also want to transplant an Abelia grandiflora into the space. Further down the garden, between some lilac trees and the green beech hedge I'm considering something that grows a little broader, possibly Cornus kousa "Satomi" or similar, although I'm having trouble finding a tree (rather than a shrub) tall enough. Another option might be the autumn flowering cherry. I decided against Davidia involucrata as I think it will grow too wide. The most worrying issue is that I had just been accepted under the National Garden Scheme to open next year for charity and now have 2 massive holes to fill! I welcome your thoughts.

Tree Advice

Click image to enlarge

  • Views: 753
  • Replies: 9
  • Posted: Thu. 3rd September 2009 14:59

Photos?

Reply from Nicola

Hi Sheron, Congratulations on being accepted to the NGS! That is great news! Any chance you could post some photos of the gaps you want to fill? It might help inspire our panelists.

Many thanks Nicola

  • Posted: Fri. 4th September 2009 08:27

Photos for Tree Advice

Reply from Sheron

Many thanks for your kind words Nicola. I'm terrified at the thought of opening and am convinced that the county organiser only agreed because she wanted to be nice to me! In the photo previously attached it's the green beech that is no longer there. The second gap is just before the urn in the distance in the second photo. I'll try to get some photos of how they look now before 23rd. Sheron

Photos for Tree Advice

Click image to enlarge

  • Posted: Fri. 4th September 2009 10:52

Tree Advice

Reply from Sheron

Since originally writing my neighbour has gone chainsaw mad and also removed 1/2 doz or so conifers all along the boundary as well! As you can imagine, this means that the boundary looks nothing like the photo's I posted on 3 Sep. All that remains are the small beech hedge (in my garden), by the rose arches. Help!

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd September 2009 19:48

Mark Gregory

Reply from Mark Gregory

Hi Sheron..
Understand your issue..just be careful that you do not get this are too bitty.a uniform hedge can give you the privicy but also they are great for showing off your plants in front.Yew is great and not that slow growing if planted well and watered well...just a thought..re the tree..liquidamber is a fine tree..but big,,do you have the space?..just think,it looks too close to the house, but i may be wrong...think about say an Amelanchier.in a mulitstem form?, has spring blossom and autumn colour and will give you height up to 6 metres, but is not invasive...what about a Prunus Autumnalis...flower December-march. and again can look great as a mulitstem form..about the same height as the amelanchier..if you plant in front of say a yew hedge,(the hedge can be kept to a width of 500mm if required) you can then underplant with what ever you like as the canopies of both of the trees are light..you could grow most things..
Let me know if you need more help..
Mark....
Mark Gregory
Landform Consultants
Tel: 01932 569 169
Fax: 01932 569 769
WWW.landformconsultants.co.uk

http://www.landscaper.org.uk
http://www.landformconsultants.co.uk

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd September 2009 20:29

Tree Advice

Reply from Sheron

Many thanks for that, Mark. The size of the liquidambar was my biggest concern. Perhaps I could put it in the gap further down the garden? I get what you're saying about a uniform backdrop. I already have an Amalanchier lamarkii in the opposite boundary. Any other suggestions? By the way, the soil is light and sandy and I'm in the process of "beefing" it up.

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd September 2009 20:55

Mark Gregory

Reply from Mark Gregory

Hi Sheron..
Liquidamber. is a magnificent tree. but expect it to be 50Ft + I.ve seen it in the est coast of the states and it's literally next to the houses 60 ft + but they don't seem to mind..plant at least 8 metres if you can away and then that should cause you no worries, other than it's size, it causes very little problems either structurally or light blocking...
The malus (aplle family are good.Malus Floribunda is an ornamental crab, with amaziing flower.( there are lots of good crab apples that will also give you winter fruit and are great for the birds..What about a Magnoila.. or Prunus Serrula? with it's amazing shiny bark effects..
If you want a decent size of tree visit www.deepdale-trees.co.uk for a look at a commercel tree nursery.. or try Barcham trees,(you can browse and buy on line as well ) and they do much smaller sizes too...fab choices..
I love spending money on trees...love trees full stop...remember sandy soils are hungry soils...they need loads of good compost...cannot put enough on. and it will pay you back. with growth and water retention...forget the fertilisers...
Mark
Mark Gregory
Landform Consultants
Tel: 01932 569 169
Fax: 01932 569 769
WWW.landformconsultants.co.uk

http://www.landscaper.org.uk
http://www.landformconsultants.co.uk

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd September 2009 21:17

Now answered

Reply from Nicola

Hi there - saw your other post asking for a reply. Does this help? Do you want to ask the panel any other questions before we close this event in 30 mins? All the best Nicola

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd September 2009 20:49

What about a Cercis?

Reply from Jason Lock

What about Cercis canadensis Forest Pansy? its a great tree, will tolerate a light soil and has good autumn colour as well as spring/early summer interest flowering on the bare stems. Having a purple foliage it will also add interest through the growing season.

What you have asked is quite a complex question and actually quite difficult to answer, its one of those need to see the site to really give a complete answer, but hope this helps.

Jason Lock MSGD
http://www.deakinlock.co.uk
http://www.landscaper.org.uk
http://www.sgd.org.uk

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd September 2009 21:14

throw in a curve ball....

Reply from Anna Taylor

I really like the trees Mark and jason have suggested - they are all great specimins and look like they would complement your scheme brilliantly.

However, one other tree you might want to consider is the Sorbus aria 'Lutescens' or the whitebeam.

Gorgeous silvery grey leaves with a pale green underside, grows to about 10m mature , flowers in spring and red berries to boot in the Autumn.

I love it as a specimin, but I can't tell whether it will be a bit too much in your garden as you have a very green scheme - but perhaps it could be a focal point further down ?

Good luck with the NGS we opened our garden at Woodhouse HQ this year - great fun !

Anna Taylor
http://www.woodhouselandscape.co.uk
http://www.landscaper.org.uk

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd September 2009 21:31