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The B&Q Garden

By garden designers Laurie Chetwood and Patrick Collins. The tallest ever garden at the RHS Chelsea Flower Show, the B&Q Garden showcases the notion that we should be planting and producing food wherever we can since it is estimated that food in London would run out in four days if supplies ceased.

The B&Q Garden by garden designers Laurie Chetwood and Patrick Collins Chelsea Flower Show 2011

The garden aims to encourage individuals and communities to develop new local and sustainable food growing spaces and make an environmental difference while enhancing urban greening. Everything in the nine metre high self-sufficient garden is edible and is supported  by its own vertical potting shed which incorporates composting, rainwater harvesting and storage, a thermal chimney, photovoltaic panels and a wind turbine.

The B&Q Garden by garden designers Laurie Chetwood and Patrick Collins Chelsea Flower Show 2011

Throughout the garden ornamental and native species demonstrate the diversity of edible plants and include plants with edible rhizomes, bulbs, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. Foliage is an important element. Not all plants will be in flower – many of the herbs, for example, are included for their aromatic leaves. The living wall has two different planting systems. The first is a collection of bespoke window boxes which contain the larger crops such as tomatoes, peppers and edible flowers; the second, is a modular living wall system which contains the herbs and provides a contrasting backdrop to the vegetables.

The B&Q Garden by garden designers Laurie Chetwood and Patrick Collins Chelsea Flower Show 2011

Manicured pleached lime trees provide the main structure planting. Clipped bay hedging and Siberian dwarf pines give the garden its evergreen content. Roses, lavender and alliums contrast with the more subtle forms of herbs such as thyme, oregano and parsley, with hostas and shuttlecock ferns in shaded areas. Many of the plants, as well as being edible, are attractive to bees and other pollinating insects and help improve the biodiversity of the garden.

The B&Q Garden by garden designers Laurie Chetwood and Patrick Collins Chelsea Flower Show 2011

More unusual species include the Aztec Herb (Stevia rebaudiana), which has very sweet tasting leaves and is used as a sugar substitute, and Spignel (Meum athamanticum) a native plant with edible leaves and roots.

The B&Q Garden by garden designers Laurie Chetwood and Patrick Collins Chelsea Flower Show 2011

Plants list       

Trees
Tilia europaea ‘Pallida’
Morus platanifolia

Hedging and Specimens
Laurus nobilis
Myrtus communis
Pinus pumila
Luma chequen

Shrubs, Perennials and Herbs
Achillea millefolium
Atriplex hortensis var. rubra
Borago officinalis
Chamaemelum nobile
Crambe maritima
Cynara scolymus
Dianthus ‘Whatfield Cancan’
Foeniculum vulgare ‘Purpureum’
Fragaria vesca
Hemerocallis ‘Corky’
Hosta sieboldiana
Iris germanica var. florentina
Lavandula pedunculata Subsp. Pedunculata
Lavandula stoechas ‘Regal Splendour’
Matteuccia struthiopteris
Mentha suaveolens
Meum athamanticum
Nepeta ‘Walkers Low’
Origanum vulgare ‘Nanum’
Origanum vulgare ‘Thumbles Variety’
Petroselinum crispum
Rosa ‘City of York'
Rosa ‘Prosperity’
Rosa ‘Jacqueline du Pre’
Rosa ‘Souvenir du Dr Jamain’
Rosmarinus officinalis
Salvia officinalis ‘Purpurascens’
Stevia rebaudiana
Thymus vulgaris ‘Compactus’
Thymus ‘Jekka’
Thymus ‘Silver Queen’
Viola ‘Bowles Black’
Viola odorata

Window Boxes
Beta vulgaris ‘Rhubarb Chard’
Brassica rapa var. purpurea
Capsicum Denver F1
Capsicum Apache F1
Calendula officinalis
Solanum melongena Bonica F1
Lycospersicon Tumbler F1
Phaseolus Hestia
Tropaeolum majus Tom Thumb Mixed

Bulbs
Allium fistulosum
Allium schoenoprasum
Allium ‘Purple Sensation’
Allium ‘Violet Beauty’
Camassia quamash

Water Plants
Acorus calamus
Nasturtium officinale
Typha angustifolia
Typha latifolia