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Search Results for "sweet"


Re: chamomile or mayweed?

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Chamaemelum nobile

Hi, Cati,
Mayweed (Matricaria recutita aka German chamomile, wild chamomile or false sweet chamomile) is a tall, erect annual that could reach a max height of 1m. Roman or English chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) is a perennial and typically doesn't grow higher than 20cm. It's fragrance tends to be stronger than mayweed. Mayweed flowers are larger with longer petals.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 29th November 2011 23:54

Re: Autumn scent climber to disguise smell of chickens and rabbits!

Message from Chris Price

In forum: Gardening for wildlife

Thank you all for your replies, the rabbit and chickens live in close proximity but the rabbit has its own area.
I think its basically time for me to get in and give the place a major makeover! I clean the basics regularly but I'll get in there and give the whole run a good digging and I'll look to get the vanodine and clean it all up.
Thanks for the advice regarding the scented climbers etc as well, I'll look to perhaps mix climbers and poted plants just to help keep a sweet smell as opposed to the general poultry / rabbit / compost smell it tends to have in that part of the garden.
On a side note I was thinking of growing some hops, I know that they won't blossom as such at this time of the year, but does anyone know if they are harmful to chickens if they manage to nibble a few?

  • Posted: Thu. 24th November 2011 10:24

Re: Ground cover

Message from Carol

In forum: Garden design

Were you looking for an ornamental? Or something productive? and just one thing to cover the whole area? Sweet woodruff is good (and low), or alpine strawberries, or several of the spreading hardy geraniums (cinerea, Anne Folkard), or lithospermum or hardy pinks. The list is surely quite long! Is it dry? or good and moist? Acidic soil? I just described some of the planting on one of my southfacing banks...

  • Posted: Thu. 3rd November 2011 20:56

Red squirrels

Comment from ChaffinFencing

In forum: Gardening for wildlife


The native Red squirrels were once a common sight across the mainland of Britain, now they are sparsely situated around Scotland, and places thought to be inaccessible to the greys, such as the Isle or Wight and Anglesey. In fact more then 75% of Britain’s estimated 160,000 red squirrels are found in Scotland.
Now they could become extinct in the next 20 years, as their population has dropped 50% in the last 50 years.
Grey squirrels carry a virus called the ‘pox virus’, first discovered in Scotland in 2005, which they (the greys are immune to) but it causes deadly to the reds.
Pox disease and the loss of much woodland over the UK have contributed to their decline.
The red squirrel is facing a long tiring battle against the grey’s that are spreading this virus rapidly.

Red squirrels are most at home amongst sweet chestnut, wild cherry, hazel and beech trees, they prefer to travel within the tree canopies rather then the woodland grounds, unlike to grey squirrels.

They are highly adapted to the woodland habitat in which they live, with their lightweight bodies, long claws, and bushy tails for balance
Their ability to climb, swing and jump is actually incredible. You may of seen a squirrel in the past and noticed that it freezes when it has seen you move, they often stay frozen like that for up to 10 minutes, until they believe its safe to move again.

They build up large nests called ‘dreys’ made up of twigs, leaves moss and hair, in the forks or trunks of their chosen tree, and this is where they will bread and spend a lot of their nocturnal time when not out looking for food.

Their diet consists of seed, shrubs, nuts, shoots, flowers, and the odd birds egg if they are lucky enough to come across. Which they can be right or left handed when eating. They need to eat daily to keep up their energies, if not then they quickly succumb to starvation and disease. The autumn food harvest is vital for their survival throughout the winter months.
They typically live

  • Posted: Thu. 27th October 2011 11:27

Re: Any ideas for screening?

Message from Ruskins Trees

In forum: Photinia x fraseri 'Red Robin'

Lou

Red Robin will do the job, but will need to be clipped to keep dense.

Your options are for a aerial hedge with a 2 metre trunk, for a hedge from ground level, those also marked with *:

Holly (two varieties similar to our native, (Sweet) Chestnut Leaved Holly and Nellie Stevens)

Photinia fraserii Red Robin*

Bay Laurel*

Portuguese Laurel*

Common/Cherry Laurel *

Japanese Privet

Ligustrum japonicum Excelsum Superbum (variegated Privet)

Leylandii (as with the other options as a standard (a 2 metre trunk, then canopy).*

Beech (not evergreen, but when hedged will retain the majority of leaves).*

Magnolia grandiflora (needs to be clipped to be dense).*

Yew *

You are welcome to contact us to discuss selection.

Robert

  • Posted: Sat. 15th October 2011 09:12

Re: Privet choice for hedging

Message from Ruskins Trees

In forum: Ligustrum vulgare

Jim

Privet are good choices, there are others. Japanese Privet is good, but I personally think they are a bit plain (although also a lower cost choice). You could use them as a backdrop to more ornamental specimens.

Your options are for a aerial hedge with a 2 metre trunk, for a hedge from ground level, those also marked with *:

Holly (two varieties similar to our native, (Sweet) Chestnut Leaved Holly and Nellie Stevens)

Photinia fraserii Red Robin*

Bay Laurel*

Portuguese Laurel*

Common/Cherry Laurel *

Japanese Privet

Ligustrum japonicum Excelsum Superbum (variegated Privet)

Leylandii (as with the other options as a standard (a 2 metre trunk, then canopy).*

Beech (not evergreen, but when hedged will retain the majority of leaves).*

Magnolia grandiflora (needs to be clipped to be dense).*

Yew *

You are welcome to contact us to discuss selection.

Robert

  • Posted: Sat. 15th October 2011 09:09

Can anyone identify this variety of plum

Question from Ray

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi
Can anyone identify this variety of plum and tell me the right time to prune the bush as it is hanging over next door? The plums are very sweet and if I take a bite at the end, the stones squeeze out easily. I understand plum trees are susceptible to disease if not pruned at the right time.

Click to enlarge images

  • Posted: Mon. 8th August 2011 17:30

Heavy tomato crops.

Question from Barry Tabor

In forum: Greenhouse

As some members already know, I have been 'running in' a new g'house. I had small ones before, but now have a more useful, larger one. I have never had such heavy crops as I am getting this year. I used canes tied to the structure and the little rings sold by the hundred to support the plants, but often wondered if that would be enough. It wasn't, and this morning I found a heavily-laden 'Alicante' plant collapsed in a heap. I have now added string ties to the other plants, and hope this will suffice (Other varieties are 'Sweet Olive' and 'Shirley'). What successful methods are employed by other members to prevent heavy tomato plants from collapsing under the weight of the developing trusses, please?
Barry

  • Posted: Sat. 6th August 2011 08:16

Sweet Cecily

Question from Malcolm Meeson

In forum: Myrrhis odorata

I have just purchased a packet of seeds for this plant and it
states to propagate between 18-22c for 2/4 weeks and then transfer to -45/+4c for 4/6 weeks. Then return to warmth but no more than 18c.
Any members propagated these seeds in the past?

  • Posted: Fri. 22nd July 2011 13:38

Cabbages

Comment from S Rodd

In forum: Brassica oleracea capitata 'Red Drumhead'

This is my first attempt at growing cabbages, both red & sweetheart. I am interested in learning how to deal with pests that eat! Any old hands got any specifics, I don't want to use chemicals unneccesarily.
Thanks

  • Posted: Tue. 12th July 2011 19:30

Please help me to identify this plant

Photo from Ragesh T V

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi everyone,
Please help me to identify this plant. Seen in roadsides. The fruits are red when ripened. The fruit is edible when in red color. The fruit is sweet in taste.I am uploading 3 photos of this plant someone needs more pictures or details i can provide that

  • Posted: Tue. 5th July 2011 09:47

plants for Shady Patio (later afternoon sun) -

Question from kaori

In forum: Ceanothus 'Southmead'

My front patio deosn't get full sun until 4pm (sprint/summer). I'd like white / green / blue / pale pink flower or green / silver foileage plants which survives in pots/planters.
Pls can anyone recommend me elegant / sweet flowers and plants?

  • Posted: Sat. 4th June 2011 17:00

Re: Does anyone know this plant/weed?

Message from Carol

In forum: Identify a plant

I think it might be Meadowsweet - Filipendula. The third one in the database when I put in meadowsweet looks much the same, but more open.

  • Posted: Fri. 3rd June 2011 15:21

Re: Rose Hanabi

Message from Tampopo

In forum: Allotments

Hello--
I came across your post when I was looking up info about the Fourth of July rose here in the US--it seems to be the same rose, just as sweet by many other names (sorry, couldn't resist). It's also called Crazy For You in the UK. I found this http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=13992 , got curious...and after looking at the pictures of all three I think they look like the same thing. This might help you: http://www.roselocator.com/rose_locator/roses/grandiflora_over_100cm/93_crazy_for_you.php

  • Posted: Fri. 3rd June 2011 02:58

Re: suggestions for small evergreen plants for a clay border please

Message from Carol

In forum: Garden design

Really 15 cm? Why so low over the whole area? That's ground cover. Can you cope with some semi-evergreens? All these low (semi or full) evergreens are doing well on my Welsh clay. Things like low-growing dianthus, Stachys bizantina (Lambs ears) doesn't say clay on the instruction, but it's growing vigorously in my clay here in Wales, Veronica prostrata, Veronica spicata (the spikes are quite airy on the white ones), violas (if you can bear to plant anything in the autumn and again in the early summer), rock soapwort and creeping thyme (might need a bit of sand and gravel in the digging hole), Galium odoratum (sweet woodruff) is not, technically, evergreen, but it doesn't disappear completely - the dry stems make a carpet. What do you reckon?

  • Posted: Wed. 11th May 2011 21:30

Re: Everlasting sweet pea

Message from Carol

In forum: Lathyrus latifolius 'Everlasting'

The instructions I read say 'cut back after flowering' rather than 'remove the plant'. I have one of these now in its third year. It died back on its own to literally nothing above ground last winter. In fact, I thought it had succumbed to the frost, but didn't dig up the woody root and noticed last week that it was sprouting again. So it is perennial, but herbaceous - dying away completely every winter and starting again from its underground stores (which will, presumably, be bigger every year).

  • Posted: Wed. 11th May 2011 21:02

Everlasting sweet pea

Question from Trish Patterson

In forum: Lathyrus latifolius 'Everlasting'

Why does the care instruction say to remove the plant after flowering? I was hoping that it was a perennial.

  • Posted: Wed. 11th May 2011 16:45

Re: Re: Russian Comfrey - Good for Bees?

Message from JusJane

In forum: Symphytum x uplandicum

Thanks Carol

Thats great to hear. I have planted veronica, knautia, wild flowers, some shrubby honeysuckles, neadowsweet, red campion, bats in the belfry and mint and have a bee house waiting for them. A red mason bee does keep popping by but has so far not taken residence :(

None of these are in flower yet so I'm hoping that time will tell. :)

I've ordered comfrey and I'll order borage soon too. But the picture your post gives is lovely and I'm jealous. But nicely so :)

J

  • Posted: Mon. 9th May 2011 12:29

Re: Ground Cover plant

Message from Carol

In forum: Identify a plant

That looks like sweet woodruff (Galium odoratum) to me.

  • Posted: Thu. 5th May 2011 22:25

Re: Re: Re: Another unidentified plant in my garden

Message from Geof

In forum: Identify a plant

I would give it a month or so because Lady Boothby really does grow that fast. It climbs like a sweet pea, so wait until it flowers, don't kill it now.
Geof

  • Posted: Tue. 3rd May 2011 16:02