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Search Results for "Acer palmatum"


Re: Re: Acer Palmatum

Message from barbardn

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Stacey, thanks for responding to my question. It has been very useful. I thought that ordinary compost would be OK but wasn't too sure. Your experience tells me what to do.

Thanks again, Barbara

  • Posted: Sun. 1st July 2012 17:43

Re: Acer Palmatum

Message from Stacey

In forum: Trees and shrubs

I repotted two of my acers into larger pots last year using ordinary compost and they're both fine, healthy and growing well.

On one, some leaves had died early (not the leaf drop that it sounds like you had?) and I think for me it was two problems: I hadn't repotted it for some time so it was a bit root bound and it also needed some oomph from new compost; I'd neglected to water it as often as I should've done, although I know with acers you have to be careful not to over water.

Good luck with your acer :)

  • Posted: Sun. 1st July 2012 08:09

Acer Palmatum

Comment from barbardn

In forum: Trees and shrubs

I have an Acer Palmatum tree which has been in a container for about 6 years. It looks like it is struggling a bit this year. It shed a lot of its leaves a few weeks ago. I think it is root bound in this pot and I wish to transfer it to a larger container. Can someone tell me what compost I should use? Someone told me that I should use Ericasious Soil. Is that correct?

  • Posted: Sat. 30th June 2012 16:22

Re: Re: Re: What is wrong with my acer palmatum "taylor"

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Taylor'

Ah, so it must be the cold winds - leaves of A. palmatum are very susceptible to sun scorch and wind scorch. As well as frost damage if there have been late frosts. They need lots of shelter and tlc when the leaves are unfurling. And, on a side note, one chance, sunny day right as leaves were unfurling could have done it.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Thu. 24th May 2012 22:06

Re: Re: What is wrong with my acer palmatum "taylor"

Message from Patricia Jones

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Taylor'

Its been pouring with rain and very cold winds.I am assuming Jennifer is in the U.K. We have had precious little in the way of Sun as yet this month.

  • Posted: Mon. 21st May 2012 10:11

Re: What is wrong with my acer palmatum "taylor"

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Taylor'

Hi, Jenneffer,
It could be sun scorch - too much intense sun when the leaves were young. A. palmatum is very susceptible to scorch.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Sun. 20th May 2012 22:48

Re: What is wrong with my acer palmatum "taylor"

Message from Patricia Jones

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Taylor'

These plants need to be sheltered from the wind. If it's in a pot move it into a more sheltered location. If it's in the ground provide a wind break to slow down the wind speed, ( Netting on a frame might help)

  • Posted: Fri. 18th May 2012 21:02

What is wrong with my acer palmatum "taylor"

Question from jenneffer dennis

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Taylor'

The leaves have begun to shrivel up and go brown.It has had plenty of water given the weather.

  • Posted: Fri. 18th May 2012 17:35

Re: Acer palmatum Dissectum update

Message from Valerie Munro

In forum: Acer palmatum var. dissectum atropurpureum 'Burgundy Lace'

Hi Joan

Thank you for sending in some photos - the story gets slightly longer!

You have the pot standing on a hard surface of crazy paving - this is going to add to the problem as when the concrete heats up, it then acts like a night storage heater and radiates the heat out again, and any pot that is standing in its direct path will get this added blast of heat.

The same thing happens in reverse in a cold spell in the winter when the soil in a standing pot can freeze and cause all sorts of problems for a plant's roots.

The best thing to do for the future is to put your pot on some sort of stand that will allow an air break between the bottom of the pot and the concrete.

This may not have singularly caused the problem with your acer, but it would certainly have contributed to it.

I hope that this helps
Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Fri. 5th August 2011 13:17

Re: Acer palmatum Dissectum

Message from Ali Gilbert

In forum: Acer palmatum var. dissectum atropurpureum 'Burgundy Lace'

My Acer has just done the same thing as I've just planted it in my newly designed garden from it being in a pot. It was a friends tree who moved to Australia and I adopted it and I remember it dropping its leaves when it was moved from their garden to mine.

  • Posted: Fri. 5th August 2011 12:53

Re: Acer palmatum Dissectum

Message from Valerie Munro

In forum: Acer palmatum var. dissectum atropurpureum 'Burgundy Lace'

Hi Joan

No matter how you feel that your acer is in idea conditions, you have changed its own personal micro-climate, and it is probably reacting to that change. It would be better to compare the conditions in your garden to the conditions in which is was in the garden centre. My local garden centre keeps its acers under a shade screen, and I know that if these were suddenly shifted out into the open, albeit it sheltered from wind and with not excessive amounts of sunlight, that they would sulk.

From your description what it is doing is going into premature dormancy.

I'm sure that you are really sad that this is happening, but I do think that it is only a temporary thing and next year the plant will have toughened up to the conditions in your garden.

Perhaps you could submit an actual pic which might confirm the diagnosis.

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Fri. 5th August 2011 12:39

Acer palmatum Dissectum

Comment from Joan Jones

In forum: Acer palmatum var. dissectum atropurpureum 'Burgundy Lace'

I bought this established Acer from a garden centre four weeks ago. It was a lush green, is still in its existing pot, and is not exposed to wind or long periods of direct sunlight. A week ago it started to change colour and has a dried up orange look and is shedding a lot of its leaves. I dont know what is happening and would appreciate help

UPDATE

I have added these actual photos of the acer

  • Posted: Fri. 5th August 2011 11:48

Re: Acer Wilson's Pink Dwarf

Message from Angie Robertson

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Wilson's Pink Dwarf'

Hello again Joan. As Kathy suggests you need to check out what is available for the size you suggest.
The Acers with the interesting bark are called coral bark. I have an Acer palmatum 'Eddisbury' (Coral bark maple) which would be too big for your spot. So you would need to look for something smaller.
There are many shrubs which offer winter interest which may fit your space. Does it need to be an Acer?
Angie

  • Posted: Thu. 30th June 2011 20:15

Re: Re: Acer Wilson's Pink Dwarf

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Wilson's Pink Dwarf'

Hi, Joan,
Acer palmatum 'Sango-kaku' is probably the most well-known Acer palmatum with attractive winter stems but there are many more to choose from. Try a search of Acer palmatum here on Shoot to find more.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Mon. 27th June 2011 20:39

Container Acer

Comment from john hutcheson

In forum: Container gardening

I have an Acer Palmatum 'Skeeter's Broom'. It is currently in a 14" container and the plant is about 1m in height. The foliage is rather light in colour just now and the roots now seem to fill the pot. I understand that this is a container palm but wonder if it should be potted into a larger pot or kept in the current pot. If it has to be potted on, eventually what size of pot will be required to hold the Acer.
Or is the advice that these plants do better in the ground?

  • Posted: Sun. 19th June 2011 12:10

Re: Re: Damaged leaves on Acer Palmatum 'Atropurpureum'

Message from Brian Rutter

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

Thankyou for taking the time to reply Kathy, I rally thought it was dying on me and your comments have reassured me everything is okay.
Again, many thanks !

  • Posted: Mon. 2nd May 2011 21:13

Re: Damaged leaves on Acer Palmatum 'Atropurpureum'

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

HI, Brian,
I wouldn't be too concerned about the damage on your Acer palmatum - the leaves are delicate when young and susceptible to damage/scorch from cold temps, too much direct sunlight, handling/moving whilst at the nursery/garden centre, etc. If the damage isn't excessive (which it doesn't seem to be the case based on the photo) and isn't too unsightly, I would leave them. Your plant is young and recently planted - it needs as many leaves as possible to make food to for energy to recover from planting and establish itself. If you do decide to remove the damage leaves, just remove the entire leaf. If you simply cut off the damaged parts, you will create a new wound which will probably turn brown - you'll have a lot of cut leaves with brown edges where the cuts were made. As far as the rods for support, I wouldn't bother. Your Acer is upright, not flopping with what looks like a strong main stem (trunk). Staking is only good for young trees that can't quite support themselves, particularly if they are planted in an exposed area, and should only remain in place for a year. In fact, research has shown that unstaked trees are stronger - they build up supportive cells in the trunk when winds push them about.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Mon. 2nd May 2011 19:29

Damaged leaves on Acer Palmatum 'Atropurpureum'

Comment from Brian Rutter

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

I just recently purchased an Acer Palmatum and noticed that some of leaves have damage/disease. I have uploaded an image of my Acer with an inset image of the damage to a leaf.
My question is how to best tackle this, do I remove the entire leaf (if so exactly where do I cut as to not cause further damage) or just snip off the affected part of the leaf ?
Additional Question:
I read that an Acer needs to be supported with cane rods. As you can tell, my gardening knowledge is not good and I am fearful of pushing the rod into the soil and hurting the plant.
Also, my acer seems to have 2 primary branches which branch off at approx 1 inch high from the soil, therefore do I need to use 2 rods for each main branch ?

  • Posted: Sat. 30th April 2011 15:12

Re: Re: Re: Re: positioning

Message from Alison Shamwana

In forum: Acer palmatum 'Osakazuki'

I can recommend Acer Palmatum "Osakazuki" in a pot. Mine sits in a semi shaded and sheltered position tucked under a large pear tree. It has survived the -15C of the last two winters here in Scotland no problem and has beautiful foliage in spring, (acers elsewhere in my garden suffered from serious windburn last spring). Each Autumn I move it onto my deck to enjoy the brief but absolutely spectacular show of colour. Not sure how long I can keep this plant in a pot, but just potted it on today and it didn't deem too rootbound.
Sorry about the lateness of my posting - what did you decide to do?
Alison

  • Posted: Sun. 27th February 2011 18:26

Re: Acer and some Rhododendron for growing in large pots

Message from Stephen Harding

In forum: Container gardening

Rhododendrons Christmas Cheer, Cunninghams White, Choremia, Gloria Mundii, Elizabeth, Scarlet Wonder, Gartendirektor Rieger and Woodcock are all slower growing compact varieties which we stock at our nursery. Pictures of all these can be found on our website www.heaselandsnursery.co.uk .
Varieties of Acer ideal for pots would be the Japanese Maples such as Acer palmatum Dissectum and Atropurpureum which are very slow growing, Acer japonicum Aureum is one of the best yellow foliaged plants or for something a bit quicker growing, Acer palmatum Bloodgood or Osakazuki would be ideal. Any good garden centre should stock Japanese Maples in varying sizes and price.
If you wanted more of a tree in a pot, try Acer pseudoplatanus Brilliantissimum or Acer negundo Flamingo. You would not be dissappointed.

  • Posted: Mon. 11th October 2010 15:49