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Search Results for "Allium"


Brown, crispy leaves

Question from Laura Waller

In forum: Actinidia kolomikta

Help! We replanted a lot of our garden earlier this year. Most of the plants are doing really well, but our Actinidia seems to be really suffering. The leaves are really brown and crispy and I can't seem to bring it back.
It is planted against an East facing brick wall with some Verbena and Allium.
Can anyone help me?

  • Posted: Mon. 26th July 2010 20:59

Re: Flower identification

Message from sonia Hunt

In forum: Identify a plant

Many thanks for the reply - I didn't know there was an Allium called purple surprise so will check it out.
Sonia

  • Posted: Thu. 1st July 2010 07:20

Flower identification

Photo from sonia Hunt

In forum: Identify a plant

Can anyone confirm which variety of the Allium from pic supplied. I'm pretty sure its purple sensation but not totally sure - any feedback would be very much appreciated.

  • Posted: Wed. 30th June 2010 18:41

Re: Appreciate identification please

Message from Greenwich

In forum: Identify a plant

I'd say it's a form of Allium giganteum.

  • Posted: Tue. 22nd June 2010 14:30

Re: Re: Allium purple sensation

Message from Lobeck2000

In forum: Allium hollandicum 'Purple Sensation'

BTW, thank you very much for this advice!

  • Posted: Sun. 20th June 2010 16:33

Re: Appreciate identification please

Message from Suzie Warren

In forum: Identify a plant

It looks like Allium Purple Sensation to me

  • Posted: Wed. 16th June 2010 12:43

Re: To move or not

Message from Kathy C

In forum: General

Hi, Erika,
It is always best to move plants when they are not in flower. Flowering requires the plant to expend a lot of energy - and so does tranplanting because the plant needs to recover from root disruption, etc. Best time to move most plants is spring or fall. For allium, the best time is early spring. Allium resent being moved so they will take a while to recover and may not flower the first year. If you must move it, I would wait until flowering is over and then once it is in its new spot, make sure it is well-watered in dry periods. Just don't overwater as this might cause it to rot.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 15th June 2010 18:50

To move or not

Question from Erika's Garden

In forum: General

I want to move some globe alliums and turks head lillies but am not sure if can do this whilst they are in flower or if I have to wait until they have finished flowering. Can anybody give advice please?

  • Posted: Sat. 12th June 2010 18:34

Re: Allium purple sensation

Message from Katy Elton

In forum: Allium hollandicum 'Purple Sensation'

Hi Lobeck,

Allium hollandicum ‘Purple Sensation’ are May/ June flowering, so it’s perfectly normal for them to be dying back now. It’s also not uncommon for the odd one to produce a bulb in the flower head as you are describing. It’s usually not advisable to use these seeds and bulbs to grow on, as they tend to result in much paler flowers, and you will lose the deep purple that you have experienced this year. To avoid this, remove these immature seed heads now before they have a chance to set seed.

Remember to add the plant to your ‘plants I have’ list to receive regular care instructions.

Hope this helps!
Katy

  • Posted: Tue. 8th June 2010 15:23

Allium purple sensation

Question from Lobeck2000

In forum: Allium hollandicum 'Purple Sensation'

Hi,

I planted 5 allium bulbs outside in a pot last October and they came up fine about 6 weeks ago. Now the flowers have all dried up and two of the 'globes' of flowers have what look like bulbs growing in the centre and all have lots of green ?seed pods where the flowers were.

Is this suposed to have happened by now? Can I plant the 'bulbs' or green pods to get new plants? And should I pick all the old flowers off and expect to see new ones?

Thank you for educating me!

Lobeck

  • Posted: Sun. 6th June 2010 18:07

Re: Can someone please tell me what this plant is

Message from Valerie Munro

In forum: Identify a plant

This is Sicilian honey garlic, or Nectaroscordum siculum. It is, as you suggest, a bulb, and is fully hardy. After the flowers, it will produce seeds thatl germinate easily. If you do not wish this plant to spread, then the smart thing to do is to remove the flowers as they fade, and before they have a chance to set seed.

I like this plant, even although it has quite a strong onioney smell to it. Its previous name was Allium siculum so you can tell who its close relatives are..

Good luck

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.com

  • Posted: Thu. 27th May 2010 15:27

Can someone please tell me what this plant is

Question from Margaret Fox

In forum: Identify a plant

This plant appeared in my garden. I did not plant it and do not know what it is - although assume it to be of the allium family. It is bulbular and about one metre tall. It is flowering now (May).

  • Posted: Thu. 27th May 2010 12:51

Leek rust?

Message from Katy Elton

In forum: Allium sativum

Hi Rebecca,

It sounds very much like leek rust (which also affects other members of the allium family), but yes please upload pictures so we can have a better idea.

If it is leek rust, for now I would remove and burn the infected leaves (don't compost them). You might get a reduced crop from these plants but otherwise they should be fine. To avoid it next year, dispose of the soil in the pots and replace with fresh stuff if you want to continue growing anything from the allium family in there. Or simply grow something else if that's easier!

Look forward to seeing your pics to double check this.

Regards
Katy

  • Posted: Tue. 20th April 2010 11:56

Not recommended

Message from Janine Pattison MSGD

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

I would recommend not altering the level of the compost/soil around the base of a shrub or tree. There is the risk that the bark will get damaged and allow disease into the plant. Rot is very possible.
Summer bulbs to consider include alliums, lilies, nectaroscordum and other bulb-like plants like canna and dahlias.
Janine Pattison MSGD
http://www.janinepattison.com
http://www.sgd.org.uk

  • Posted: Thu. 15th April 2010 18:20

Allium ursinum

Comment from Miriam Mesa-Villalba

In forum: Allium ursinum

Ramsons can be found in damp woods, scrub, hedges and on shady banks, where its garlicky aroma will fill the air. The leaves are edible but have a suprisingly mild flavour. This is an excellent plant for ground cover in a wet corner of the garden.

  • Posted: Wed. 17th June 2009 19:41

Allium christophii

Comment from Miriam Mesa-Villalba

In forum: Allium cristophii

The onion family is a large one, with almost 300 species growing wild in the northern hemisphere. This species produces one of the most dramatic flowers of the family. It is an important nectar source and has the added advantages of being hardy and drought tolerant.

  • Posted: Wed. 10th June 2009 17:34

Allium

Message from Samantha Heaton

In forum: Identify a plant

Hiya,

I'll pop some more photos on soon which may help. Just come back from Centre Parcs unfortunately my camera got broken while I was away and I'm waiting for my new one from e bay. It is exciting but also frustrating cause I'm so green!

  • Posted: Wed. 10th June 2009 00:28

Allium

Message from Georgie

In forum: Identify a plant

You are very welcome, Samantha, but obviously it's not Purple Sensation! Could be 'Moly'?

It sounds like you've struck gold with your new garden. I hope you continue to get lots of enjoyment from it. :)

Georgie

  • Posted: Tue. 9th June 2009 20:11

Allium

Message from Samantha Heaton

In forum: Identify a plant

Thank you Georgie. Since posting the photo the plant has unfolded into yellow flowers, but definately an allium as you suggested. Thanks again I have moved into this house last summer and I keep finding these lovely suprises. I'm new to gardening and learning all the time, I love to know what everything is.

  • Posted: Tue. 9th June 2009 15:16

An Allium of some kind

Message from Georgie

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi Samantha

Yes, it looks like an ornamental Allium. There are many varieties but if it's about 60cm tall I'd hazard a guess at 'Purple Sensation'.

Georgie

  • Posted: Mon. 8th June 2009 21:05