OK
In progress indicator

Search Results for "pittosporum"


Re: Another plant needed to be ID

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi,
The shrub is Pittosporum tobira .
The white flower looks like Shasta daisy but the leaves are wrong for that guess. Are those leaves the ones that belong with the flowers or are they overshadowing the flowers' leaves?
Kathy C

  • Posted: Thu. 6th September 2012 17:08

Re: Ideas as to what to plant appreciated

Message from Allot-a-fun-ment

In forum: Garden design

I understand Patricia's suggestion of Thyme, but feel you'd need to buy really decent sized plants to make an instant impact and well, it'd all just be Thyme.

I would personally suggest for interest all year round - depending on how long it takes for your house to sell - that you invest in four shrubs spaced out evenly starting 0.5m in from either end.

Widely available evergreen shrubs that I would suggest are Pittosporum Tom Thumb (lovely purple mature leaves with bright green juvenile leaves which turn purple, lovely plant), Pieris (various to choose from), Skimmia (various to choose from), Hebe (various to choose from) and perhaps an Aucuba. Mix them up depending on the cultivar you buy and you'll have a lovely mix of colour and texture. Buy 5-10ltr plants to give instant impact. Although these plants will need pruning in roughly 1-2 years, they are low maintenance and look good all year round. Commonly used by landscapers and professional gardeners so will give a professionally planted look to your border.

Dig a hole for each (allowing for the top of the root ball to sit roughly an inch below the eventual surface) and add a spade full of compost into the hole dug. Pop the plant in, level off and check you've put their best side facing outwards then cover with the dug out soil - press well in or gently heel in. Water in well with roughly one regular water can full each.

Add a top layer of decent quality bark mulch for weed suppressent, water retention and a professional finish.

For the plants - retail - plus a bag of compost and a bag of decent mulch, it shouldn't cost you more than £55-100.

It'll definitely give your house the edge providing the rest of the front garden area is well kept.

Good luck

  • Posted: Mon. 6th August 2012 22:16

Re: Evergreen Shrubs

Message from Judi Samuels Garden Design

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Catherine, you could also include Choisya ternata, Pittosporum, Ceanothus, Hebe, Laurus nobilis (Bay).. there are so many.. I am always happy to talk plants. Do feel free to make contact if you would like to.
Happy plant hunting..
Best wishes, Judi.. :-)

  • Posted: Wed. 18th July 2012 07:20

Re: Addition to Medium long-lasting shrub query.

Message from Fred Beattie

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hello, have you considered pittosporum Silver Queen. I had one some years ago that grew to over six feet. Also viburnum Bodnantense Dawn is good and don,t forget camellias

  • Posted: Sat. 20th August 2011 18:17

Re: New garden, new gardener. Need help 1!

Message from Penzance Lara

In forum: Identify a plant

Aha! Thank you very much. It's a LOT like Pittosporum tobira, although the flowers are more yellow than creamy white at the moment. Now I know what it is, I can start to look after it better. The whole garden has been rather neglected. Any handy hints gladly accepted.

  • Posted: Sun. 1st May 2011 05:16

Re: New garden, new gardener. Need help 1!

Message from Carol

In forum: Identify a plant

If you look at the details of Pittosporum tobira - how different is it?

  • Posted: Sat. 30th April 2011 22:05

Re: Pittosporum 'Garnetii' Partly Died

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Pittosporum 'Garnettii'

Hi, David,
Would you be able to post a photo? Might make is easier to recommend pruning, etc (depending upon the extent and exact location of the damaged/dead bits).
Kathy C

  • Posted: Wed. 27th April 2011 21:11

Pittosporum 'Garnetii' Partly Died

Question from David MArsh

In forum: Pittosporum 'Garnettii'

We gave a Pittosporum 'Garnetii' which the centre appears to have died off, there has been a healthy growth and leaves on several branches for the last 2 years but the centre is bare. Basically what can we do?.

  • Posted: Sun. 24th April 2011 12:24

Re: Re: A young Pittosporum

Message from Alan & Theresa

In forum: Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Loxhill Gold'

Hi Kathy
Thanks for your advice. I think it will have to be replanted which I will do over the next couple of days.
Theresa

  • Posted: Tue. 19th April 2011 15:49

Re: A young Pittosporum

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Loxhill Gold'

Hi, Theresa,
It is not unusual for a plant to lose some leaves after planting, especially older leaves. However, if the leaf loss is excessive, there could some problems with either aftercare or with the planting process itself. First, has the shrub been adequately watered since planting? New plantings need regularly watering until they are established. If it has been getting adequate moisture then it could be a planting problem. Is it perhaps too deep? Or, there could be air pockets around the roots. Give the shrub a gentle tug. If it seems to 'give' easily, it may need to be dug up and replanted more firmly, with care taken to make sure there is full soil to root contact in the planting hole.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Mon. 18th April 2011 19:38

A young Pittosporum

Question from Alan & Theresa

In forum: Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Loxhill Gold'

Planted about 1 month ago, why are some of the leaves drying out and becoming brittle? Any helpful suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks
Theresa

  • Posted: Sat. 16th April 2011 13:55

Re: Pruning pittosporum Abbotsbury Gold

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Abbotsbury Gold'

Hi, Lisa,
Your 'Abbotsbury Gold' should bloom in late spring or early summer. It is in pruning group 1, which means it should be minimally pruned, after flowering, if needed. This means to simply remove any wayward, dead, damaged or diseased shoots. You can lightly shear it back, and it will grow said buds in the growing season (the rest of the summer). Have heard some gardeners say theirs liked an annual light shearing - just don't go too far back on the branches.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Mon. 14th February 2011 20:01

Pruning pittosporum Abbotsbury Gold

Question from Lisa Sargent

In forum: Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Abbotsbury Gold'

I am very pleased with the shrub I planted late last year...I'd like to restrict its size and have just read that it can be sheared after it has bloomed. Would this be May/June? I have also read that it produces buds for the following year after blooming - so wouldn't I be cutting them off? Advice appreciated

  • Posted: Sun. 13th February 2011 15:35

.Information please

Question from Mike Bingham

In forum: Lilium 'Fata Morgana'

Wouldlike to know about caring (in particular pruning etc.) in relation to the following please:-
Pittosporum - Abbotsbury Gold & Tom Thumb.
Sarcococca, Sambucus (Sutherland Gold & Black Beauty), Photina (Little Red Robin), Physocarpus (Lady in Red) and Cordyline

  • Posted: Thu. 14th October 2010 18:15

.

Question from Mike Bingham

In forum: Lilium 'Fata Morgana'

Wouldlike to know about caring (in particular pruning etc.) in relation to the following please:-
Pittosporum - Abbotsbury Gold & Tom Thumb.
Sarcococca, Sambucus (Sutherland Gold & Black Beauty), Photina (Little Red Robin), Physocarpus (Lady in Red) and Cordyline

  • Posted: Thu. 14th October 2010 18:13

.

Question from Mike Bingham

In forum: Lilium 'Fata Morgana'

Wouldlike to know about caring (in particular pruning etc.) in relation to the following please:-
Pittosporum - Abbotsbury Gold & Tom Thumb.
Sarcococca, Sambucus (Sutherland Gold & Black Beauty), Photina (Little Red Robin), Physocarpus (Lady in Red) and Cordyline

  • Posted: Thu. 14th October 2010 18:13

Re: Suggestions for new planting

Message from Katy Elton

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Catherine,

As the site is sunny yet windy why not think about prairie style planting? A combination of grasses and flowers would be interesting to look at, you could incorporate some evergreen shrubs for winter structure, and try and include flowers that leave attractive seedheads for additional winter interest.

Possibilities include:

Grasses – Miscanthus , Stipa and Molinia .

Flowering plants –
Rudbeckia , Eryngium , Achillea , and Monarda .

Winter structure –
Carex flagellifera is an evergreen grass, Pittosporum is an evergreen shrub that can compliment prairie planting quite well, and Callicarpa bodinieri var giraldii ‘Profusion’ is deciduous but really comes into interest in winter when it displays bright purple berries.

Hope this gives you something to think about. If you do go for any of these plants remember to add to your ‘plants I have’ list to receive regular care instructions.

Katy



  • Posted: Sun. 3rd October 2010 11:58

Pittosporum tenuifolium

General post from Lelsey McAllister

In forum: Pittosporum tenuifolium

Thank you for the advice - I did as suggested and cut back and also improved air circulation and the plant is now recovering and growing well thanks for your help

  • Posted: Mon. 17th May 2010 10:34

Hi Lesley

Message from simon sira

In forum: Pittosporum tenuifolium

I was wondering whether you managed to get your Pittosporum sorted out. I have exactly the same problem and would really appreciate if you could advise on the matter,

  • Posted: Fri. 14th May 2010 12:24

Shrubs/trees for a terrace

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Container gardening

Hi, Kevin,
I certainly agree - decent sized Acer palamatum can be expensive. Another concern about putting one on your terrace is scorch - emerging leaves in can be easily damaged by wind, sun, or frost. It won't hurt the plant much at all, but will look unsightly. Only way to avoid that is to move to the most sheltered spot you can find for winter/spring. Using Prunus cerasifera 'Nigra' could be done but it will get quite large - too large for a container unless you are ready to do a lot of restrictive crown & root pruning. Other suggestions for purple leaves, flowers, etc are:
- Cotinus coggyria 'Royal Purple' - one of my favourites - gorgeous purple colour, great, fun flowers
- Prunus x cistena - Purple-leaved sand cherry is compact and gives all that a large cherry gives.
- Loropetalum chinense f. rubrum - purple foliage and pink, witch-hazel-like flowers - it is tender in frost so it would need protection but it is evergreen!
- Enkianthus cernuus var. rubens - leaves turn purple-red in autumn
- Hebe - quite a few to choose from with purple leaves or purple-variegated leaves; 'Neils' Choice', 'Lady Ann' 'Amy' & 'Black Beauty' to name a few
- Rhododendron 'Everred'
- Leucothose 'Scarletta' - evergreen
- Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Tom Thumb' - dwarf so perfect for a container, evergreen, but not much in the way of flowering and is a bit tender.
- Weigela florida 'Foliis Purpureis'
So, there are just a few ideas. I think all of these suggestions are on this site. I vote for the Cotinus or Prunus x cistena! :)
Please let me know what you choose!
Kathy C.
K

  • Posted: Thu. 29th April 2010 20:47