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Search Results for "Allium"


Allium

Message from Samantha Heaton

In forum: Identify a plant

Thank you Georgie. Since posting the photo the plant has unfolded into yellow flowers, but definately an allium as you suggested. Thanks again I have moved into this house last summer and I keep finding these lovely suprises. I'm new to gardening and learning all the time, I love to know what everything is.

  • Posted: Tue. 9th June 2009 15:16

An Allium of some kind

Message from Georgie

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi Samantha

Yes, it looks like an ornamental Allium. There are many varieties but if it's about 60cm tall I'd hazard a guess at 'Purple Sensation'.

Georgie

  • Posted: Mon. 8th June 2009 21:05

Can you identify this plant

Message from Danny Mercer

In forum: Identify a plant

Kathy yes it looks like it is a Allium Cowanii, after checking a photo in google.

Many thanks.

Danny

  • Posted: Fri. 22nd May 2009 09:41

Having a guess

Comment from Kathy C

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi, Danny,
I am fairly certain your plant is Allium neapolitanum (syn. Allium cowanii) as it looks as if the flowers are clustered, somewhat erect umbels. Grows 20-40cm tall, best in full sun. Is it in a sheltered place because it is supposed to be frost tender. Lovely plant!
Kathy C.

  • Posted: Fri. 22nd May 2009 04:30

Can you identify this plant.

Message from Danny Mercer

In forum: Identify a plant

Many thanks for your reply but having checked the plant you suggest it is not the same.
Allium family

Danny

  • Posted: Tue. 19th May 2009 17:29

Allium family?

Message from Wendy

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi Danny
It looks as though it could be a member of the Allium family, hence the funny smell. I have similar in my garden, Allium triquetrum. They are lovely planted with bluebells for a woodland effect. Best wishes, Wendy

  • Posted: Mon. 18th May 2009 12:02

Allium schoenoprasum

Comment from Miriam Mesa-Villalba

In forum: Allium schoenoprasum

Although native, this is a rare plant in the wild, being generally confined to rocky calcareous grassland in SW England and South Wales. Where it is found elsewhere, it is probably as an escape from old herb gardens. Chives have a distinctive onion-like smell. Bees collect both nectar and pollen from this plant.

  • Posted: Sat. 16th May 2009 17:55

Ornamental Alliums

Comment from Georgie

In forum: Ornamental plants

I'm very fond of ornamental Alliums, particularly the globe types such as Cristophii and Purple Sensation. But I also like the smaller ones and thought I'd share this photo of A. Neopolitanum just beginning to open. I'd be interested to hear about other members' favourites.

Georgie

  • Posted: Wed. 13th May 2009 13:47

Wildlife border

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Gardening for wildlife

Hi, Jo
What fun planning a new border!
I have a few suggestions that might work, but they are based on the assumption that the border is not too wet (even thought near the pond)?
A couple of low-growers to attract wildlife(I tried to keep all suggestions under 60 cm) could be:
- Hyssopus officinalis - up to 60cm wth narrow, aromatic, dark green leaves and spikes of purple-blue flowers from midsummer to early autumn. Thrives on chalky soils nad is drought tolerant
- Most Thyme
- Alllium schoenoprasum - Chives - A favourite spring bloomer of mine and great in the kitchen, too. No bigger than 60cm, though usually shorter.
- Allium cristophii
- Allium sphaerocephalon - I admit, this gets taller than 60cm, but it is a 'see-through' plant - the foliage is low to the ground and the flowers are on long, thin stalks that rise above the foliage of lower-growing plants - I love these!
- If cats aren't a problem, what about Nepeta?
- Sedum 'Herbstfreude' or any other similar cultivar is great for attracting wildlife in autumn.
- Any prostrate, cascading Rosemary will attract loads of bees in flower.
- Calamintha nepeta 'White Cloud' - Lesser Calamint is a favourite of bees, too.
- Dwarf Monardas - there are some cultivars of Bee Balm (Bergamot) that stay under 50cm - 'Pink Lace', 'Fireball', 'Pink Supreme' are just a few - a definite butterfly magnet. Just watch out for powdery mildew on them.

If the ground closest to the pond is at all moist, have you considered Caltha palustris (a favourite pond/marginal plant of mine).

I hope this short list is of some use. If I think of any others, I will be sure to add to the list. Hopefully some other members will be able to add to it, too.
Happy planning and planting and please let me know what you choose.
Kathy C.

  • Posted: Wed. 18th March 2009 21:19

Wedding flowers

Message from Georgie

In forum: General

Hi Heather. I'm in London so I've looked back over what was in flower in May this year. You don't say what design or colour scheme you have in mind but my recommendations would include scented leaved Pelargoniums, Dicentra Alba and Aquilegias. There are also a number of Alliums which flower around that time which might look rather stately set amongst some trailing Vinca minor. Whatever you decide I hope you have a lovely day.

Georgie

  • Posted: Thu. 21st August 2008 21:07

See Chelsea 2008 Show Gardens

Comment from Nicola

In forum: Events & Gardens to visit


Hi all - we have now uploaded the plant lists of the major show gardens for Chelsea Flower Show 2008 . Please look for 'event gardens' in the links at the top. We will continue to update this area adding images of the actual gardens once built.

Some plants are going to be used in a across the 2008 show gardens. These include: Soleirolia soleirollii, Alchemilla mollis, Hakonechloa macra, Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light', Astrantia major subsp. involucrata 'Shaggy', Buxus sempervirens

Unusual plants will include: Nothofagus antarctica, Drimys lanceolata, Paris polyphylla, Dracunculus vulgaris, Anigozanthus, Xanthorrhoea

Star plants that we like a lot include: Geranium 'Lily Lovell', Iris chrysographes, Allium stipitatum 'Mount Everest', Geranium phaeum 'Album', Gardenia jasminoides, Iris sibirica 'White Swirl'

Which ones do you like? Are you going to visit this year?

  • Posted: Thu. 8th May 2008 19:54