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Search Results for "potato"


Solanum Album potatoe vine)

Question from Jo Germain

In forum: Solanum jasminoides

The above plant was put in this year as I lost the last one during the hard winter. The green foliage is turning to a dark mauve colour. Please advise me what to do. I have also planted nearby 2 clematis mondana one also is turning the same colour

  • Posted: Thu. 28th July 2011 10:50

Re: potato haulm collapse

Message from Sprout

In forum: Edible gardening

If your bag is made of a breathable fabric such as the Smart Pots then you just need to water. When moving the bag the new ground will pull moisture out of the bag. I would give it a good watering and if you haven't fertilized in awhile do so now. If any of the plant is severely wilted prune it back.

  • Posted: Thu. 30th June 2011 15:11

Re: Re: potato haulm collapse

Message from stephen byrne

In forum: Edible gardening

Hi Carol
The bags were positioned on a cultivated part of the
garden but are now on concrete slabs .

Steve

  • Posted: Wed. 22nd June 2011 08:46

Re: potato haulm collapse

Message from Carol

In forum: Edible gardening

I wonder if you have disturbed some roots (water-seeking roots) that had snuck out of the bottom of the bag into the earth below (or were they on concrete/ slabs?). They might recover if you just keep watering them - a can every other day or so.

  • Posted: Tue. 21st June 2011 23:10

potato haulm collapse

Question from stephen byrne

In forum: Edible gardening

Help , Im growing Pentland Javelin potatoes in 40litre bags .
These were planted on 1st Aprill and had a huge growth of folliage up untill about one hour ago . I moved the bags to a more sunny spot in the garden and noticed that all the haulms
in both bags have collapsed .
Could anyone out there offer any advice as to what has gone wrong and is my crop doomed for this year.

  • Posted: Tue. 21st June 2011 19:09

Potatoes in containers.

Question from robin reardon

In forum: Edible gardening

Hi everyone

i am going to plant some Charlotte and Maris Peer potatoes shortly in containers, I have them chitting at the moment. My question is I have read about sowing potatoes in Aug for Christmas harvest, so would I hold some of my seed potatoes back till then or buy new in Aug when I presume they would still be on sale. I was thinking about Maris Piper.

Warm Regards
Robin

  • Posted: Fri. 18th March 2011 10:02

Re: What is this plant?

Message from Plant Mad

In forum: Identify a plant

It looks a lot like a potato plant, or another nightshade. Do some careful digging and see if you can find a potato in the ground, instead of just roots. :)

Gisela

  • Posted: Mon. 14th March 2011 18:04

Re: Re: pentland javelin potatoes

Message from stephen byrne

In forum: Edible gardening

Thanks Pete thats put my mind at rest on that one .

As Im a novice if you have any good advise on growing potatoes
this would be appreciated

  • Posted: Tue. 8th March 2011 14:18

Re: pentland javelin potatoes

Message from PETE West Wales

In forum: Edible gardening

Hello Stephen

Referring to your question on removing flower heads for a better yield.

Although the jury still seems to be out on this the general consensus is that its a waste of time.

Having said that Bob Flowerdew recommends removing them.

Below are just two comments taken from - gardenweb.com

Agree, some cultivars flower profusely, others rarely if ever. Never noticed any effect on yields either way.


I agree, no problemo. To me they usually indicate that all is well with the plants (for the varieties that do flower) and that they are coming along as they should be. It sometimes indicates that you can gently dig around the outer areas to find a few new potatoes for a real treat.
Bill P.

  • Posted: Sun. 6th March 2011 09:41

pentland javelin potatoes

Question from stephen byrne

In forum: Edible gardening

Hi everyone - my first post - be gentle
I am going to have a go at growing pentland javelin potatoes in containers this year . Any good advise will be most welcome .
If you remove the flowers before they bloom will this give you a higher yield . Thanks

  • Posted: Sat. 5th March 2011 19:51

Re: Re: Re: Hostile Roof Terrace

Message from Louise Gregory

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Hi, myself and my neighbour Sarah share a 4 x 5m second floor balcony next to a very busy main road facing out towards south east. Three sides were exposed to all the elements with added heavy traffic noise enclosed with similar railings to the ones you have, ours are 1.5m high, the remaining side is solid rough brick with an access door to each flat at opposite ends.

To give some protection from the wind we bought 3 rolls of 1 x 5m rush screening from a Focus sale at a cost of £24.00 for all 3. We attached the rolls in the mid point of the railings leaving small gaps at top and bottom with plenty of thick garden wire at the top and bottom, overlapping in the exposed corners. Along the 5m front we constructed from recycled wooden planks and pallets 2 tall box planters and attached a long window type box planter between. Trellis is attached to the back and above the wooden planters by scaffolding poles for clematis and outdoor lights. We have a low chunky pine table that slots tightly but only part way underneath giving a useful pots/tools/bits storage area that is hidden from view yet safe.

Over the sides of the railings we have 2 large and 2 small hay racks that trail masses of nasturtium and lobelia grown from seed. In one corner we have a mixture of wild flowers and woodland plants in pots among a variety of interesting moss/fern/fungus covered logs with a small trickling water feature. The other corner is having a tiered corner wooden planter constructed to hold black bamboo, oriental poppies and anything else that we find that is free or very cheap!!

We also use troughs and baskets around the inside perimeter to grow peas, mixed salad, strawberries, tomatoes, herbs and edible wild flowers, with potatoes growing in sacks behind the doors!!

The rushing gave enough protection to let us learn which plants could grow best and where, so that the plants themselves provide additional protection from weather and some sound proofing.

Hope this is useful

Lou

  • Posted: Fri. 26th November 2010 13:42

Re: Harvesting Potaoes

Message from Carol

In forum: General

I thought the best plan was to remove flowers, and generally to wait until the plant dies off before harvesting. But if none of your plants have died off, and you want some potatoes, dig one up! If you leave the flowers they turn into small (poisonous) fruits and will take up some of the energy that you want the plants to put into the potatoes.

  • Posted: Sun. 13th June 2010 11:05

Harvesting Potaoes

Comment from William Stewart

In forum: General

This is the first time I have grown potatoes, they are doing very well, although at the moment are only just showing signs of flowering on one batch which I grew from supermarket left overs that had started to sprout, The Roosters I bought from a garden center are at the moment about 3' high and are not showing any signs of flowering, how do I know when to harvest....I have read that I should wait till the flowers have died off, others say I should wait untill the plant has died off.
Any help please.

William Stewart.

  • Posted: Sat. 12th June 2010 08:16

Hi

Message from James

In forum: Container gardening

Cracking Broccoli Mum!

I grew some Rudolph broccoli but not impressed, my favourite is plain and simple early PSB.

My asparagus is coming through now, we had four spears for dinner last night, lots more growing but not ready to cut yet.

Pink fir apple potatoes have surfaced, growing in a container in the greenhouse, I need to earth them up.

Love,

James

  • Posted: Tue. 20th April 2010 13:35

Allotment

Message from Marissa Zoppellini

In forum: Allotments

Hi, congratulations! I was very lucky and got my allotment within weeks of asking and it is on my doorstep. I got it just before the growing season was about to start and had loads of rubbish and weeds to clear like yourselves. I am just starting my third year and it is still not completely developed but I can see the improvement year on year - my highlights were potatoes, tomatoes beans and strawberries last year with many disappointments too - raspberries, peas and sweetcorn all suffering from a combination of late sowing or lack of water. My advice would be don't be too ambitious, enjoy your successes and expect (and learn from) your failures. All the best, look forward to seeing your progress.
Marissa

  • Posted: Sun. 28th February 2010 17:19

Organic Gardening Basic Training

General post from Sarah Newton

In forum: Allotments

Time: 21 February 2010 from 9am to 2:30pm
Location: Spa Hill
Street: 180 Spa Hill
City/Town: Norwood, London, SE19 3TU

http://www.spahill.org.uk/

Phone: 07879007156
Event Type: organic, gardening, basic, training
Organized By: Tim Gundry-White

Spa Hill Allotment Society has been organising and running modular basic garden training for ten years.

The complete course takes place on two Sundays, the first in February and the second in April. The courses are run by volunteers from the allotment site. We can cope with a maximum of 45 students.

Training is fun! Places are going fast! Closing date for places 1 week pre to each course - so get your skates on! Apply asap!

21 February 2010 event
This will cover digging, composting and sowing seeds in containers.

18 April 2010 event
This will cover planting out raised plants, planting bulbs, corms and tubers (potatoes, onion and garlic), preparation and sowing into a seedbed. All seeds, planting material, tools and equipment are provided.

Each day comprises the three one hour modules and a light lunch. The student will get a set of notes based on the course and a certificate of attendance.
Each event can be taken separately at £30.00 each or they can be done as a complete package for £50.00.
This whole course is conducted on Spa Hill Allotments, South East London.

Tim Gundry-White
Director of Training
Spa Hill Allotments

Phone or e.mail Tim to make your booking
mob: 07879007156
e: training@spahill.org

  • Posted: Mon. 2nd November 2009 16:15

Organic Gardening Basic Training

General post from Sarah Newton

In forum: Allotments

Time: April 18, 2010 from 9am to 2:30pm
Location: Spa Hill
Street: 180 Spa Hill
City/Town: Norwood, London, SE19 3TU

http://www.spahill.org.uk/

Phone: 07879007156
Event Type: organic, gardening, basic, training
Organized By: Tim Gundry-White

Spa Hill Allotment Society has been organising and running modular basic garden training for ten years.

The complete course takes place on two Sundays, the first in February and the second in April. The courses are run by volunteers from the allotment site. We can cope with a maximum of 45 students.

Training is fun! Places are going fast! Closing date for places 1 week pre to each course - so get your skates on! Apply asap!

21 February 2010 event
This will cover digging, composting and sowing seeds in containers.

18 April 2010 event
This will cover planting out raised plants, planting bulbs, corms and tubers (potatoes, onion and garlic), preparation and sowing into a seedbed. All seeds, planting material, tools and equipment are provided.

Each day comprises the three one hour modules and a light lunch. The student will get a set of notes based on the course and a certificate of attendance.
Each event can be taken separately at £30.00 each or they can be done as a complete package for £50.00.
This whole course is conducted on Spa Hill Allotments, South East London.

Tim Gundry-White
Director of Training
Spa Hill Allotments

Phone or e.mail Tim to make your booking
mob: 07879007156
e: training@spahill.org

  • Posted: Mon. 2nd November 2009 16:14

Hits and misses

Message from Marissa Zoppellini

In forum: Edible gardening

My year started off with a miss, all my autumn sown garlic and onions got the rot and I lost them all - but I am going to give it another go this year, with lots of leaf mould added to the bed to improve drainage. The other miss was my peas but my fault this time as I simply didn't water them enough, I shall have to do better next time! Hits were all types of bean, courgettes and cherry tomatoes. I am also happy with erigeron which I grew from seed, it has been in flower for months and months and is so cheery! I am now looking forward to the arrival of my greenhouse. Wendy, I have to say I love growing potatoes in bags, in the two years I have grown them in beds they have been attacked by wireworms and slugs and those that escaped were spiked by my daughter when she dug them up! All the best, Marissa

  • Posted: Tue. 6th October 2009 10:59

Hits and Misses!

Comment from Wendy

In forum: Edible gardening

Hi folks
Well the year started out optimistically with lots of seeds sown and germinated. Successes include beetroot, tomatoes, sweetcorn and many others but I grew potatoes in sacks this year and can't say I'll bother again. I think I got no more a dozen potatoes! I'll stick to growing them in the ground in future.

I also grew Nicotiana 'Fragrant Cloud' and got carried away with the amount of seedlings (somewhere around the 50 mark were grown)! However, they weren't wasted as each year, local gardens open up to the public in aid of a charity so they were donated to the worthy cause.

Would love to hear about anyone elses hits and misses?

All the best Wendy.

PS: Spent a fortune this afternoon on seeds for next year!!

  • Posted: Sun. 4th October 2009 19:11

Solanum rantonnetii (Potato bush blue)

Question from Sophia Opperman

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Aw shoot! Thanks for trying to help me. it would have made sense to load a photo hey. Will remember for next time. I unfortuantely cut it back again yesterday afternoon. I'm in sa and cut all the dead off mid aug which is end of our winter. By end aug the new shoots started coming out and started to grow long stringy insteady of short bushy. So i left about 3 knots and cut the rest off. I hope it will now become bushy and flower. Hope i didn't kill it now!!! I will let it grow a little and post a photo or should i just post a photo of what it look like now?

  • Posted: Tue. 15th September 2009 05:51