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Search Results for "Astrantia"


Re: Please Identify

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

Astrantia major, many colours, including 'Abbey rd, Hadspen blood, which are red and then there are pink ones and white ones that have been around for a long time.

  • Posted: Sun. 12th August 2018 22:09

Re: Please Identify

Message from Carol

In forum: Identify a plant

That could be astrantia - rubra I think is the name of this lush maroon version.

  • Posted: Sun. 12th August 2018 19:44

Re: Pests or normal

Message from Carol

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

You would expect both to die back completely over winter - there would be nothing green and vigorous showing above ground of either eryngium or astrantia. If still in their pots, there is a greater risk of frostbite and waterlogging. If in their final places, there is a greater risk of being eaten by soil organisms.

  • Posted: Wed. 21st September 2016 18:10

Re: Re: Can anyone identify this plant please?

Message from Cristina Dexter

In forum: Identify a plant

I have seen it at RHS Hyde Hall just last week, it is an Astrantia indeed, I'm attaching a photo for your info.

  • Posted: Sun. 14th June 2015 18:17

Re: Can anyone identify this plant please?

Message from alex

In forum: Identify a plant

That's an Astrantia. Fantastic plant. I have three!

  • Posted: Sun. 14th June 2015 17:29

Re: Re: GA-3

Message from Dave Jones

In forum: Abelia chinensis

Hi Chris,
Thanks for your reply. I actually posted this in December 2012 and posted it in the wrong forum.
I obtained GA-3 from Plants-a-Float.co.uk last year and have used it with variable results. It certainly gives good results with old seed. I found a packet of Lobelia tupa seeds that were about 10 years old. After soaking half the seeds in GA-3 for 24 hours, I sowed them and got over 80% germination. The other half didn't germinate at all!.
But other results were not so good. Some seed that requires stratification didn't germinate if soaked in GA-3 and not given the chilling treatment (Astrantia being a good example.)
My conclusions are that, if you want good germination, sow fresh seed! A batch of Thalictrum seed germinated (without either stratification or GA-3) having been harvested from a plant in my garden and sowed straight away. They were placed in a propagator at 20?C and were up in 4 days!

  • Posted: Sun. 23rd March 2014 20:38

Re: PLEASE help me ID this plant!

Message from Jane de Silva

In forum: Identify a plant

I'm pretty sure that's Astrantia maxima (I expect youll have discovered that by now - it must have flowered!) I don't have a photo of the young foliage, but here's one of the flower, which has rather stiffer bracts than the Astrantia major varieties. It can be rather invasive (not unlike ground elder!)

Hope this helps...

Jane
www.norfolkcottagegarden.co.uk

  • Posted: Tue. 14th January 2014 11:49

Re: Re: a little help please

Message from Paul Grinham

In forum: Identify a plant

Thanks very much Elaine. I am sure you are correct. Astrantia rings true.

  • Posted: Wed. 22nd May 2013 12:51

Re: a little help please

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

check and see if it is one of the many astrantias, the leaf looks like one, the pic. of the flower is not clear. The only plant with bressingham turns up with Bergenia, but I am sure there are quite a few introduced by them

  • Posted: Wed. 22nd May 2013 00:54

Re: Astrantia

Message from Angie Robertson

In forum: Astrantia 'Snow Star'

Don't forget next year when the first flush of flowers have finished cut the plant right back to the ground, foliage included. It will regenerate new foliage and a 2nd flush of flowers.
Astrsntia don't like root disturbance so if moving them in future try to lift as much soil with the plant as possible.

  • Posted: Sat. 12th January 2013 00:54

Re: Astrantia

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Astrantia 'Snow Star'

Astrantia's are generally shade lovers, they also go dormant for winter, if you want you can tidy them by shearing their foliage.

  • Posted: Fri. 11th January 2013 15:10

Astrantia

Question from Karen-Marie

In forum: Astrantia 'Snow Star'

Can you please tell me if this plant dies down over winter and all three of mine have and what care should I give them in spring? This my first attempt with this beautiful plant. I fell in love with it at the BBC garden show last year however when I got them home they didn't do we'll in my borders (started to wilt and look sickly) so I transferred them to pots and out them on the patio (half sun/half shade). Hope you can help? Any advice would be gratefully received.
Kind regards
Karen-Marie

  • Posted: Fri. 11th January 2013 09:51

Re: Whitefly

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

HI, Margaret,
I have heard that milk controls the spread of powdery mildew and other fungi, and sour milk for whitefly. However, I have never used it before. If it is a severe infestation, it might be better to try an insecticidal soap of some sort.
Not sure about the Astrantia - whitefly doesn't always bother it. It looks like a nutrient deficiency - possibly iron. Initially, iron deficient plants have yellowing leaves but the veins are still green. In later stages, the entire leaf is a stippled yellow. Perhaps try a feed and spray with insecticidal soap.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Thu. 26th July 2012 17:37

Whitefly

Comment from Margaret Bailey

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

I have noticed that several of my plants have whitefly and are starting to look worse for wear. I heard that 6% full fat milk sprayed on will control them in a greenhouse-has anyone had success with this outside?
My Astrantia Venice has discoloured leaves- does this look like whitefly damage or something else??
Thanks!..

  • Posted: Thu. 26th July 2012 15:43

Re: Astrantia help

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Astrantia 'Moulin Rouge'

Hi,
H4 is a code meaning fully hardy - these are plants that can handle temps down to -15C (5F). I don't think it was cold that was the problem. Where were they planted? Do they get enough light? Any chance they might have been planted too deeply?
Kathy C

  • Posted: Mon. 16th April 2012 19:41

Astrantia help

Comment from Mrs Lorna Dyter

In forum: Astrantia 'Moulin Rouge'

I planted 3 Astrantia plants last year in a border, one of them flowered but all seemed to be doing well. But this year there is no growth at all on these plants. Are they not hardy (not sure what H4 code means on the plants on your website)?
Do I need to plant some more new plants this year to replace these?
Please advise.

  • Posted: Sat. 14th April 2012 10:24

Narrow leaves, spires of tiny beige bells

Question from hillwards

In forum: Identify a plant

Can anybody identify this plant, which has sprung up beside an astrantia seedling that I bought earlier this year. The stems have narrow leaves topped with spires of tiny beige bells; the bottom flowers are open while the top are still in bud.

Click to enlarge image

  • Posted: Mon. 17th October 2011 17:57

Re: Good or Bad: Common Red Soldier Beetle

Message from Angie Robertson

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

These insects are friends in your garden. I have had lots of them recently on various plants but they seemed to find my astrantia most attractive!
These bugs are not destroying your plants, there must be something else

This is what wikipedia has to say on them:
The common red soldier beetle will grow up to a centimetre. Nearly all their body is coloured red yellowish. Only the last bit of the elytra is black. The body is flat and elongated. The chitin armour is very soft, resulting in the German name of this species as Weichkäfer (meaning "soft beetle"). The black thread-like antennae are also relatively long. The equally long legs have an orange colour, which become notably darker only at the end.
This beetle is very common in Europe and Anatolia. Introduced to North America, it is well-established in British Columbia and Quebec and recently recorded in Ontario[1]. One will find it very often in bushes or on grass and fields.
These beetles are active during the daylight hours, when they will hunt mostly for small insects on top of flowers.
Fairly often one will find many of them on Apiaceae or Asteraceae like thistles.
After copulation the females will lay her eggs. The larvae are soil-dwellers which hunt for snails and insects. After a year and several moults the larvae will pupate and then emerge as fully grown beetles

  • Posted: Wed. 20th July 2011 20:16

Good or Bad: Common Red Soldier Beetle

Question from Bob van Geldere

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

I recently planted a new border and my astrantia majors have been invested with this little red beetle. They spent most time on the astrantia but have now moved on to my Jacobs ladder and hydrangea. A bit of research suggests that these are positive contributors, however it appears that they literally suck the life out of the plants. Does anybody have any advice on this matter?

Thank you very much in advance for your support!

Bob

Click to enlarge image

  • Posted: Tue. 19th July 2011 20:45

Good or Bad: Common Red Soldier Beetle

Question from Bob van Geldere

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

I recently planted a new border and my astrantia majors have been invested with this little red beetle. They spent most time on the astrantia but have now moved on to my Jacobs ladder and hydrangea. A bit of research suggests that these are positive contributors, however it appears that they literally suck the life out of the plants. Does anybody have any advice on this matter?

Thank you very much in advance for your support!

Bob

Click to enlarge image

  • Posted: Tue. 19th July 2011 20:45