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Search Results for "Chrysanthemum"


Re: Plant identification help needed

Message from Carol

In forum: Plants most searched for in Shoot

Some sort of marigold, or chrysanthemum?

  • Posted: Tue. 9th July 2019 09:01

can you identify this shrub

Photo from Margaret Bland

In forum: Identify a plant

leaf has chrysanthemum/geranium aroma

  • Posted: Wed. 3rd July 2019 10:48

Re: Plant ID - chrysanthemum tree?

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

Edgeworthia chrysantha, daphne family, winter blooming.

  • Posted: Wed. 9th May 2018 13:42

Re: Plant ID - chrysanthemum tree?

Message from Nicola

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi Emma, do you have larger format images and maybe some close-ups of the flower and leaf? The images are very small and hard to make out. Cheers, Nicola

  • Posted: Tue. 8th May 2018 14:30

Plant ID - chrysanthemum tree?

Question from Wild Edge Garden Design

In forum: Identify a plant

Does anyone know what this tree might be? This image is taken in winter when the tree is in full flower. My client calls it a chrysanthemum tree but Google doesn't pull anything up when I search under that name (other than standard chrysanthemums). I haven't actually seen the tree, only this picture and am struggling to ID from this. Any help appreciated. Many thanks. Emma

  • Posted: Tue. 8th May 2018 12:03

Re: Can anybody tell me what this is?

Message from Carol

In forum: Identify a plant

How much detail do you want? The leaves and flowers look like a chrysanthemum to me, but I couldn't tell you which variety....

  • Posted: Tue. 10th May 2016 10:31

Re: Re: Small Chrysanthemum with daisy colour

Message from Bob Bruyn

In forum: Identify a plant

Thanks Elaine!

  • Posted: Tue. 30th June 2015 10:53

Re: Small Chrysanthemum with daisy colour

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

Martricaria or feverfew.

  • Posted: Sat. 27th June 2015 11:58

Small Chrysanthemum with daisy colour

Question from Bob Bruyn

In forum: Identify a plant

I came home from vacation to find this beautiful tall plant struggling to reach the sun from under my Thuja orientalis. It looks like small Chrysanthemums with daisy colour. It is about 80cm tall.
I'm having trouble finding an exact name. Any ideas?

  • Posted: Fri. 26th June 2015 14:19

Re: Can anyone tell me what this plant is. It seems to be appearing all over my garden

Message from Nicola

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi Adam, Patricia on Twitter says "could be a variety of poppy or chrysanthemum but not sure on that". Hope that helps? Thanks Nicola

  • Posted: Wed. 24th June 2015 10:25

Re: Cut flowers

Message from Clockhouse Nursery

In forum: General

Dahlias & Chrysanthemums are two old favourites although there are tonnes of plants now considered for 'cut flowers'. Your other answers sound good for inspiration...dont forget google search for 'flower gardening' or 'flower gardening in shade' is free.

Plugs or pots? plugs are cheaper but can have higher failure rate so are best potted on into pots (9cm for example) before planting out. Bigger pots (9cm,1ltr & 3ltr) have great root systems so survival rate is higher but they are generally more expensive to start with.....swings and roundabouts.

Dont forget dahlias are grown from tubers (or roots) which should still be able to get now, and some other annual plants can be grown from seed (cosmos for example).

The plant world in general is a minefield of choice, trial and error is often the route to success.

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 10:00

Re: Trying to identify plant

Message from Jennifer Stackhouse

In forum: Identify a plant

Chrysanthemum? Don't know variety!

  • Posted: Sat. 17th August 2013 07:54

Re: Please name this plant

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

check out chrysanthemum pacificum, it is a lovely plant, flowers not as spectacular as most cultivated varieties.

  • Posted: Tue. 13th August 2013 18:18

Re: Can you identify this flower?

Message from Maz

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi, pretty sure its Chrysanthemum carinatum 'Polar Star'. It's a hardy annual that makes an excellent cut flower. Flowers June-Sept. and requires full sun. Hope that helps :)

  • Posted: Sat. 26th January 2013 19:02

plants for 50p

Comment from Michael Hanbury

In forum: General

Hi just bought a garden Chrysanthemum for 50p dont know anything else about it. It seems to be dieing back which is why it was 50p I guess so I just planted it in the garden thought I'd see what happens.
any thoughts or tips
many thanks

  • Posted: Wed. 10th October 2012 21:12

landscaping ideas

General post from Arline Ryan

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Gardening ideas:
For planning, it is possible to keep the flowers in your garden throughout the duration of growth. Borders and beds are planted with annual and perennial flowers that bloom at different times of year. By choosing carefully at first, and the care of the flowers since then, the flowers overlap each other, so there's never a time when the old blooms disappear, but new one is beginning to show color.

Preparing the soil for flower beds or borders requires greater care than planting a garden. For one thing, digging must be deeper. There is too much to dig the bed 2 feet deep, although 1 1 / 2 feet is adequate. It is, of course, possible to grow flowers in a shallower bed than this, but the deeper you dig, the better your production will be.

All heavy loads should be divided. It's a good idea to spread some sand, ash or bottom ash on the ground to break. It is also possible that work manure, well rotted manure, grass clippings or peat moss in the background. Do not sign the bottom floor down, but let it settle naturally.

Marga it must be used for topsoil, for example, well-rotted manure, humus, peat, compost or well-screened gravel. Wood ashes are fine for spring, and lime can be used to loosen the soil. You might think about the character of its soil and consider the special fertilizer that contains the elements your soil needs. Should the use of manure, be careful not to let it touch the roots of plants.

Should the use of manure, be careful not to let it touch the roots of plants. The color issues should be taken into account when planning flower borders and beds, so that while there is enough contrast in texture and color of flowers, is at the same time, an attractive combination.

A plan for a bed of annuals, for example, could be designed to stress zinnias, with contrast provided by flowers as soft as chrysanthemum, scabiosa, nasturtium, cosmos and candytuft. Location of the flower bed is important. Ideally, it should be near the house, facin

  • Posted: Thu. 22nd September 2011 12:03

Overwintering Chrysanthemums

Message from Martin Gale (windygale)

In forum: General

Hi Kathy, your a godsend, ill do that this weekend, i live in Wiltshire so the frost isn't to bad, so a hard prune and loads of mulch will be the plan
Thank again
martin

  • Posted: Wed. 4th November 2009 20:35

Overwintering Chrysanthemums

Message from Kathy C

In forum: General

Hi, Martin,
No worries about the delay. What to do to overwinter depends on where you live. If you live in an area prone to hard frosts/freezing conditions, you should first cut back all flowers stems to about 20cm then lift the crowns and store over winter in loamless compost in a frost-free place. In areas with light frost, leave then were they are and mulch with a deep, dry mulch. Then cut back in spring (leaving dead stems will add further cold protection). If you do lift them, make sure they don't dry out completely over the winter. Though dormant, they will still need some moisture. Hope this has been of some help.
Kathy C.

  • Posted: Tue. 3rd November 2009 19:59

chrysanthemums

Message from Martin Gale (windygale)

In forum: General

Hi Kathy,I'm not sure what type they are as my mum bought them and gave them to me when they were going over, so i cut them back and feed them and got another flowering, but as you can see (sorry for bad pictiure) they are nice flowers and last a long time, she got the plants for mothers day this year, they were pinched out to make a small compact plant, but after my hard pruning they grow about three foot tall and a good bushy plant, one for a garden focal point next year, with Dahilas,and nerines,
thanks, sorry for the delay,
martin

  • Posted: Sun. 1st November 2009 19:40

Preparing Chrysanthemum for winter

Message from Kathy C

In forum: General

Hi, Martin,
Don't want to give misleading advice so would you let me know what type/species you have?
Thanks!
Kathy C.

  • Posted: Tue. 27th October 2009 18:45