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Search Results for "Cordyline australis"


Re: What is the name of this plant

Message from Simon Hickmott

In forum: Identify a plant

It's cabbage palm, Cordyline australis purpurea. It's not actually a palm, I should point out, but sort of palm-like. A bad winter will often kill off the top but there's every chance yours will regrow, usually from the base.

  • Posted: Wed. 17th March 2021 20:41

Re: Unidentified plant

Message from Patricia Jones

In forum: Identify a plant

Cordyline australis Grows BIG, has orange blooms when mature, Very hardy in windy location.
I have one which was in the wrong place in my garden when I moved in 20 years ago. I moved it in a wheel barrow. I'd need a JCB to move it now!
The Blackbirds nest in it most years.

  • Posted: Mon. 30th April 2012 22:04

Hi all, 28 year old starting gardener

Comment from Darren Owen

In forum: New member

I hope to gain some experience from this site so all help is welcome.

I Posted this in the 'Container Garden' section and it might be in the wrong place, so i will post it here.

I've recently moved into a new house with my girlfriend and wanted to make my front garden look better. I have stripped everything down apart from (i think) damson plum tree and a little rose bush which only has 3 stems. My garden is divided in 2, with a path way going to the house and slate waste on both sides, i want to make my garden out of planters. i bought 2 Red Star Cordyline Australis Cabbage Palms to put on both side of the pathway leading into the house. i built a homemade planter which is Length 37" Width 29" Depth 12". I would like to get some flowers into the planter and sit it in the middle of one side of the garden. I also bought a Solar Power Cherub Garden Water Feature birdbath, which i thought i could sit in the middle of the planter with flowers of some sort around it. All the help would be much appreciated and my gardening knowledge is at its minimal. Not just advice on what i said but if you could advise me to do some more as well.

Thanks,

Darren

  • Posted: Tue. 25th October 2011 14:38

Help, 28 year old guy wants to start gardening

Question from Darren Owen

In forum: Container gardening

I've recently moved into a new house with my girlfriend and wanted to make my front garden look better. I have stripped everything down apart from (i think) damson plum tree and a little rose bush which only has 3 stems. My garden is divided in 2, with a path way going to the house and slate waste on both sides, i want to make my garden out of planters. i bought 2 Red Star Cordyline Australis Cabbage Palms to put on both side of the pathway leading into the house. i built a homemade planter which is Length 37" Width 29" Depth 12". I would like to get some flowers into the planter and sit it in the middle of one side of the garden. I also bought a Solar Power Cherub Garden Water Feature birdbath, which i thought i could sit in the middle of the planter with flowers of some sort around it. All the help would be much appreciated and my gardening knowledge is at its minimal. Not just advice on what i said but if you could advise me to do some more as well. Thanks, Darren

  • Posted: Tue. 25th October 2011 12:25

New shoots on 'dead' frost damaged tree

Question from liz hankins

In forum: Cordyline australis

My Cordyline Australis was a beautiful mature 25ft tree until this year when it succumbed to the winter and I had to remove all the greenery and cut back the rotted wood. It is now re-shooting- but at ground level with 15 ft of trunk above it and 3 branches at the top. Should I leave them to see if it shoots higher and wrap this winter ( I did not protect it last year) or remove all the wood above the shoots?

  • Posted: Sat. 1st October 2011 23:11

Brown spots. Is my palm sick?

Comment from Hans Schumann

In forum: Cordyline australis

I have been worried about the brown tips of my Cordyline australis for a while. Now I have noticed brown spots on the lower parts of the leaves (see picture). Could this be a disease?

  • Posted: Tue. 31st May 2011 18:18

Re: Frost damage to a Cordyline australis

Message from Valerie

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Linda, thanks for your swift reply. I watched BBC i player today. Fortunatly my cordyline has not got the fungus disease yet. I do'nt know wether to cut back the bare branches as they look discoloured where the leaves have gone,or just wait and see,Valerie

  • Posted: Tue. 12th April 2011 10:21

Re: Frost damage to a Cordyline australis

Message from Linda Regel

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Valerie,
did you see BBC Gardener's World on Friday -I expect it is still on the BBC i player if not. There was a feature on frost damaged cordylines on the show.
Linda

  • Posted: Mon. 11th April 2011 14:34

Re: Frost damage to a Cordyline australis

Message from Linda Regel

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Valerie,
did you see BBC Gardener's World on Friday -I expect it is still on the BBC i player if not. There was a feature on frost damaged cordylines on the show.
Linda

  • Posted: Mon. 11th April 2011 14:34

Frost damage to a Cordyline australis

Question from Valerie

In forum: Trees and shrubs

I have a cordyline australis which is about 15 years old, 5m tall with a single trunk up to 3m then many branches. The leaves have been dropping/blowing off over the last few weeks. Not sure whether to chop it down now or leave to see if any new shoots appear. Or is there any emergency treatment I could give to save it?

  • Posted: Sun. 10th April 2011 15:24

Re: Re: Cordyline australis 'Red Star'

Message from Dave

In forum: How to use the site

Thanks a lot Nicola. Do I just cut them as near to the main stem as possible?

  • Posted: Wed. 19th January 2011 20:15

Re: Cordyline australis 'Red Star'

Message from Jo Clark

In forum: How to use the site

Hi there,

You can easily reinvigorate your cordyline by removing the dead leaves, and, if it is in a pot, rather than in the open ground, you might also want to try re-potting it with some fresh compost to give it a bit of a boost. Most cordylines are hardier than people expect - they look quite tropical but at the horticultural therapy centre and nursery where I volunteer, we didn't lose any last winter (2009-2010) despite the prolonged freezing conditions, and the initial signs are that we have not lost any this winter either.
The leaves can be tough to remove though - my tip is that a good pair of scissors is often more help than secateurs for cordylines.
Good luck with it!

  • Posted: Wed. 19th January 2011 10:08

Re: Cordyline australis 'Red Star'

Message from Nicola

In forum: How to use the site

Hi Dave - thanks for joining Shoot and for your question. Do you mind posting into the forum for this plant? There are already some questions about this plant posted there by Carlos & Jane. It helps to keep plant questions altogether. If you click this link below, and then the Ask Us tab, you'll see what I mean:)

Cordyline australis Read Star

All the best, Nicola

  • Posted: Wed. 19th January 2011 08:36

Cordyline australis 'Red Star'

Comment from Dave

In forum: How to use the site

Hi

After a bad winter my Red Star has gone brown and most of the leaves have broken and are facing downward. Can I recover it in any way?

  • Posted: Tue. 18th January 2011 20:55

Re: Re: prune cordyline australis

Message from Eileen Christie

In forum: Cordyline australis

Thanks for that. Actually noticed today that one is sprouting from the bottom, so now they will get some feed, a bit of surgery and I will try to grow some patience. :)

  • Posted: Tue. 29th June 2010 19:10

Re: prune cordyline australis

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Cordyline australis

Hi, Eileen,
They should sprout from where you cut. Those cuts look fine and will probably encourage more branching. Supposedly, the best time to do this is in winter, but others have reported doing it a various times of the year with no problem.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 29th June 2010 18:57

prune cordyline australis

Question from Eileen Christie

In forum: Cordyline australis

My cabbage palms took a real hit this winter. My neighbour tells me they suffered similarly about 40 years ago and recovered. However, there is no sign of any shoots so I think it must be time to prune. The question is - how much. I do not want to take them back to stumps as I like 2 trees framing the house. I have marked lines on the photo. Would this amount be OK, I wonder? Grateful for any hints.

  • Posted: Mon. 28th June 2010 09:57

cordyline care

Question from n hitchman

In forum: Cordyline australis 'Torbay Red'

I have a potted cordyline australis torbay red.It has a shoot just above the soil level and it seems to be affecting the growth/ condition of the rest of the plant. Can it be safely removed without further damage to the main plant?

  • Posted: Fri. 4th June 2010 19:26

Replanted 'Red Star' is dying

Question from Carlos Monteiro

In forum: Cordyline australis 'Red Star'

Hi some friend of mine changed home and gave me a 1.5 meter tall Cordyline australis 'Red Star' it was healthy but now it's drying out, the leaves are curling and brown, is there anyway to save it? how frequently should I water it and how can I save it?

  • Posted: Thu. 27th May 2010 10:59

Cordyline australis

Message from Katy Elton

In forum: Cordyline australis

Hi Laura,

Fantastic news that your cordyline survived the winter! Many were not so lucky this year. These plants tend to flower once they are well established. How long this takes can depend on growing conditions, the site, temperatures etc. and of course can vary from plant to plant.

I'd be inclined to give it protection next winter if I were you. It would be such a shame to lose it and have to start all over again after it finally reaching flowering maturity.

Hope this helps.

Katy

  • Posted: Tue. 11th May 2010 14:22