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Search Results for "Liquidambar styraciflua"


Re: Re: Liquidambar Styraciflua

Message from Norman Read

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Good tips, many thanks Carol

  • Posted: Thu. 30th June 2011 10:07

Re: Re: Liquidambar Styraciflua

Message from Norman Read

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hello Kathy,

Very many thanks. I will submit the request, as I want to add this tree to my plant lists.

regards,

Norman

  • Posted: Thu. 30th June 2011 10:06

Re: Liquidambar Styraciflua

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi, Norman,
If you bought it from a reputable nursery/grower, and there is not cultivar name in single quotation marks, then you can assume it is the straight species Liquidambar styraciflua, of which all cutlivars are derived. The straight species isn't here on Shoot, but if you put in a request for it to be added, I'm sure it will appear on the site soon!
Kathy C

  • Posted: Mon. 27th June 2011 20:28

Re: Liquidambar Styraciflua

Message from Carol

In forum: Trees and shrubs

It's the extra bit of the name that defines a variety, Norman. But I guess there might be an original, non-varietal Liquidambar styraciflua. I was advised to buy Worplesdon because of its special colour in the autumn - but they are all fairly gorgeous as these things go. I think if you watch it carefully in the autumn, and it matches the description of one of those in the database, then that is probably what you have. The other thing is the shape - the 'slender' one is very slender, and Worplesdon is not a wide spread. So the shape will tell you something too.

  • Posted: Fri. 24th June 2011 09:07

Liquidambar Styraciflua

Comment from Norman Read

In forum: Trees and shrubs

I have a tree which arrived with the name 'Liquidambar Styraciflua' on its label. It seems there may be several varieties of this tree, as on Shoot I see Liquidambar Styraciflua 'Worplesdon', L.A. 'Lane Roberts', 'Slender Silhouette' etc, all clearly very different. Is Liquidambar Styraciflua a variety in itself, or if not how can I tell what variety I actually have?

Norman

  • Posted: Thu. 23rd June 2011 17:04

Re: Small tree suggestions

Message from Luis Moreno Landscapes

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Wendy,
I've got a simple list of small trees/big shrubs that always find useful and try to use when designing small spaces. Have a look, hope it helps.
- Amelanchier canadensis
- Amelanchier lamarckii (multi-stemmed)
- Abies koreana
- Prunus subhirtella ‘Autumnalis’
- Sorbus hupehensis
- Malus tschonoskii
- Cornus florida
- Liquidambar styraciflua
- Betula utilis 'jacquemontii'

  • Posted: Wed. 26th January 2011 23:09

how to support a liquidambar

Question from david

In forum: Liquidambar styraciflua 'Lane Roberts'

I planted a liquidambar styraciflua 2/3 years ago and now 10 foot high. However the trunk is very weak and it cannot stand upright without support at 6 foot level. Is this normal? What support should I put in place as it is currently bending over and almost touching the ground?

  • Posted: Sun. 12th September 2010 07:21

Tree Advice

Question from Sheron Deards

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Until recently a 40 year old beech hedge marked the boundary between my garden and my neighbours. Some of the plants were in my neighbours' garden and some in ours. Unfortunately, my neighbour has chopped all of his down, along with several conifers. This means I've lost the backdrop to many plants and gained a gap of around 12 ft near the house and another of around 10 ft about 20 metres away. Of course, I could replace the wire link fence with a 6 ft wooden one to retain privacy, but I would rather use this as a planting opportunity and do not wish to reinstate hedge. I would like to plant a tree in each gap with possibly shrubs and perennials underneath. I realise the trees will cast shade onto the garden but I feel the added interest will make up for it. Although I know quite a bit about plants I'm always scared to make a decision when it comes to trees. Will they get too big or wide for my long, narrow garden? Will they cast too much shade? For the 12 ft gap near the house, where the remaining beech hedge is purple, I'm considering Liquidambar styraciflua or Pyrus calleryana "chanticlear". I also want to transplant an Abelia grandiflora into the space. Further down the garden, between some lilac trees and the green beech hedge I'm considering something that grows a little broader, possibly Cornus kousa "Satomi" or similar, although I'm having trouble finding a tree (rather than a shrub) tall enough. Another option might be the autumn flowering cherry. I decided against Davidia involucrata as I think it will grow too wide. The most worrying issue is that I had just been accepted under the National Garden Scheme to open next year for charity and now have 2 massive holes to fill! I welcome your thoughts.

  • Posted: Thu. 3rd September 2009 13:59

This plant is featured at Chelsea Flower Show 2009

Comment from Nicola

In forum: Liquidambar styraciflua 'Lane Roberts'

Liquidambar styraciflua 'Lane Roberts' (Sweet gum 'Lane Roberts') has been used in The HESCO Garden by Leeds City Council for Chelsea Flower Show 2009.

  • Posted: Sun. 17th May 2009 11:59