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Search Results for "Matteuccia struthiopteris"


Wet Cold Feet

Message from Matt Nichol

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Hi Eileen,

Freezing, Wet and Interesting……tough call!

Due to the narrow nature of the bed many of the plants I can suggest will be perennials and therefore lack winter structure. Ligularia, Male Ferns, Matteuccia struthiopteris, Hemerocallis, Rheum palmatum (? frost hardyness to -15C), Peltiphyllum is very nice, Persicaria bisorta 'Superbum' Astilbe, Primula would all be suitable. For shrubs Viburnahm opulus 'Compactum' or Cornus alba 'Argentiovariegata' would give form and shape to the planting but might be too big. You could simply replace the Hebe, from New Zealand they are happy with water. Alternatively Carex buchanii or Phormium something like 'Tricolour' would be good with wet feet.

What ever you do work with the conditions, trying to change them will require massive effort and often has disappointing results.

Hope that helps.

Matt Nichol MSGD
http://www.broadviewgardendesign.co.uk
http://www.sgd.org.uk
twitter:@bvgardendesign

  • Posted: Thu. 15th April 2010 18:53

This plant is featured at Chelsea Flower Show 2009

Comment from Nicola

In forum: Matteuccia struthiopteris

Matteuccia struthiopteris (Ostrich fern) has also been used in The Foreign & Colonial Investments' Garden for Chelsea Flower Show 2009.

  • Posted: Sun. 17th May 2009 15:38

This plant is featured at Chelsea Flower Show 2009

Comment from Nicola

In forum: Matteuccia struthiopteris

Matteuccia struthiopteris (Ostrich fern) has been used in The HESCO Garden by Leeds City Council for Chelsea Flower Show 2009.

  • Posted: Sun. 17th May 2009 12:02

Evergreens for jungle/tropical garden

Message from David Sewell

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Hi Karen,
I smiled when I saw this question. One of the main reasons people love 'junglely tropical' gardens is that the plants are big and bold rather than 'not taking up much room' but obviously space is at a real premium in your garden.
There are the usual suspects like tree ferns (Dicksonia Antarctica) Cordylines, Fatsia japonica and Yuccas which can be used for the main accent plant in a scheme.
Smaller plants might included various hardy ferns - I think Polystichum setiferum 'Divislobum' is a beauty, Dryopteris felis-mas (Hardy male fern) Matteuccia struthiopteris (shuttlecock fern) and varieties of asplenium (which are smaller.) From my travels in rain forests in south America and Asia ferns are present in every conceivable shape and size so I'd definitely want a few of them in the garden.
The smaller bamboos in pots might be useful - Sasa veitchii has the right feel to it but needs to be contained otherwise it'll run everywhere. Shibataea kumasasa is also a lovely exotic looking thing which is easier to manage. Instead of bamboo you could try the Miscanthus grasses which aren't evergreen but sometimes it's nice to have some sort of seasonal change in the landscape. Miscanthus saccharaflorus is a brilliant grass that gets up to 12ft tall but doesn't take up too much space laterally (please excuse the spelling here - they may be slightly wrong - I'm trying not to waste time looking them up!)
For ground cover plants with a slightly rain-foresty feel about them (not necessarily evergreen though) you could try Epimediums, saxifraga fortunei, smilacina racemose (grows to 2-3ft but looks fab), tiarellas, Iris foetidissima, ….the list goes on!
Hopefully this will get you thinking..
All best,
David

David Sewell NCH, NDH
http://www.the-gardenmakers.co.uk
http://www.landscaper.org.uk

  • Posted: Sat. 21st March 2009 11:02