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Search Results for "Miscanthus"


Re: Any idea what this is?

Message from Penny Leech

In forum: Identify a plant

Hah! Cracked it. It's a seedling from a mature Miscanthus. In the parent plant the leaves are mostly folded lengthwise so the white line is not visible. Ive just spotted one that is not folded, and there is the white line.

  • Posted: Thu. 27th September 2018 17:33

Re: Molinia caerulea subsp. caerulea 'Moorhexe'

Message from Clockhouse Nursery

In forum: Molinia caerulea subsp. caerulea 'Moorhexe'

It like moist but well drained soils but will not do well long term in sodden or bone dry....not many plants do. Miscanthus might be more resilient.

  • Posted: Thu. 11th September 2014 15:27

Re: Plant identification name please

Message from Ben's Botanics

In forum: Identify a plant

Definitely a Miscanthus, but you'd need a real grass expert to tell them apart (and they'd need to see the grass in the flesh).

  • Posted: Sun. 27th October 2013 15:20

Re: Plant identification name please

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

Not as familiar with grasses, could it be miscanthus gracilis, or miscanthus sinensis morning light?

  • Posted: Sun. 29th September 2013 18:22

Re: Please help...

Message from Carol

In forum: General

I'd avoid bamboo because I have seen how some varieties can spread. The clump formers won't necessarily help you in a long thin plot, either. Easy to care for and fast-growing are usually exclusive terms - if it grows fast it will want some maintenance! Some things can be encouraged to cling just to a few wires held in place with pins. I'd be inclined to go for something like Jasminum nudiflorum which is evergereen and has yellow flowers in winter, and mix it up with some climbers like Clematis montana (read around and see if you can find a less vigorous cultivar). I have a clump of Miscanthus zebrinus which is in the kind of conditions you describe and after 3 years has made a good solid clump of robust upright stems with flashes of yellow - it's there most of the year, too. The other thing you could do is widen the path, put down some membrane and gravel and then put pots of interesting things along the fence which you can change about in the year if you feel like it.

  • Posted: Thu. 8th August 2013 10:51

Re: Miscanthus? And a nice red one.

Message from Paul Webb

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi Kathy,

Thanks so much for the correction - having just googled imaged it I believe you´re right.

Thanks to both of you!

Paul

  • Posted: Tue. 13th November 2012 20:20

Re: Miscanthus? And a nice red one.

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi, Paul,
I believe these are Pennisetum flower spikes, not Miscanthus. Miscanthus tend to be more open at the top of the spike. I agree with Elaine, looks like crepe myrtle (Lagerstroemia).
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 13th November 2012 17:32

Re: Miscanthus? And a nice red one.

Message from Paul Webb

In forum: Identify a plant

Thanks for the response. I have no idea what a seed head is, though! Oh well.

  • Posted: Sun. 11th November 2012 21:46

Re: Miscanthus? And a nice red one.

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

Can you take a picture of the seed head on the last picture. I don't know if you'll can grow crape myrtle, it looks a bit like it, they usually like hot summers to produce a bloom.

  • Posted: Sat. 10th November 2012 23:49

Miscanthus? And a nice red one.

Question from Paul Webb

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi,

Are the first 2 images miscanthus? And are they the same type? The third picture I have no idea what it is.

Thanks in advance

  • Posted: Sat. 10th November 2012 19:02

Re: Have my grasses died?

Message from Kathy C

In forum: General

Hi, Vicki,
So sorry about your Acer. I, too, lost one after a particularly harsh winter when I used to live on the east coast of the US. As far as your grasses, P. setaceum 'Rubrum' is not hardy so I would say it is dead - many like to treat it as an annual for this very reason. P. virgatum 'Squaw' and M. sinensis are hardy, with 'Squaw' being able to take colder temps than Miscanthus. Of those two, I would expect your Panicum to have definitely survived as long as 1)it was firmly planted in the ground and 2) it was not in excessively wet conditions over the winter. Cutting back was the right thing to do. Give it a few more weeks and hopefully they will start to send up new leaves
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 12th April 2011 23:16

Have my grasses died?

Question from Vicki

In forum: General

I planted 3 grasses in the autum last year (Pennisetum Setaceum Rubrum, Miscanthus Sinisis & Panicum Virgatum 'Squaw'). All 3 seem to be dead but I'm not sure if they might still spring into life. I've cut all the dead foliage back. How long should I wait before giving up on them?

I'm in Edinburgh and we had an extremely severe winter (my huge 20 yr+ Japanese maple has died as a result).

  • Posted: Tue. 12th April 2011 20:11

Re: Miscanthus sinensis 'Malepartus' seed collection

Message from Mez

In forum: Miscanthus sinensis 'Malepartus'

Thanks Kathy, I did have a look around and saw that too. Might give it a go though and see what happens.

  • Posted: Thu. 3rd February 2011 15:51

Re: Miscanthus sinensis 'Malepartus' seed collection

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Miscanthus sinensis 'Malepartus'

Hi, Mez,
From what I can gather, 'Malepartus' is one of the Miscanthus cultivars that is sterile. Even if it did set viable seed, it most likely would not come true to type.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Wed. 2nd February 2011 18:40

Miscanthus sinensis 'Malepartus' seed collection

Question from Mez

In forum: Miscanthus sinensis 'Malepartus'

Can I collect seed from this plant and will it be true to the parent plant?

  • Posted: Wed. 2nd February 2011 09:05

Re: Suggestions for new planting

Message from Katy Elton

In forum: Trees and shrubs

Hi Catherine,

As the site is sunny yet windy why not think about prairie style planting? A combination of grasses and flowers would be interesting to look at, you could incorporate some evergreen shrubs for winter structure, and try and include flowers that leave attractive seedheads for additional winter interest.

Possibilities include:

Grasses – Miscanthus , Stipa and Molinia .

Flowering plants –
Rudbeckia , Eryngium , Achillea , and Monarda .

Winter structure –
Carex flagellifera is an evergreen grass, Pittosporum is an evergreen shrub that can compliment prairie planting quite well, and Callicarpa bodinieri var giraldii ‘Profusion’ is deciduous but really comes into interest in winter when it displays bright purple berries.

Hope this gives you something to think about. If you do go for any of these plants remember to add to your ‘plants I have’ list to receive regular care instructions.

Katy



  • Posted: Sun. 3rd October 2010 11:58

Re: Help to identify these plants

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi, Russ,
The yellow flower looks like Inula, most likely Inula hookeri . The white flower is some cultivar of Leucanthemum x superbum, possibly 'Highland White Dream' . The grass is Miscanthus, most likely Miscanthus sinensis 'Zebrinus' .
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 21st September 2010 17:31

Help to identify these plants

Question from Russ

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi if anybody could help me identify these plants it would be much appreciated. I think the grass is a miscanthus of some kind? but not too sure of the white or yellow flowers.
Cheers.

  • Posted: Tue. 21st September 2010 10:07

Perennials for flowere beds

Message from douglas

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Beware Alstromeiria as it can often spread everywhere and quickly - once spread , very difficult to remove. You can really take your pick from Heleniums, Asters (especially Frikarti Monch), Nepeta (Six Hills Giant - another spreader but easily controlled),

Phlox/Penstemmons and a number of perennial grasses including New Zealand sedge/Miscanthus chinensis and others.
A current favourite is Astrantia Major /Ruby wedding/Shaggy - there are others but these will offer long flowering periods.

  • Posted: Wed. 10th March 2010 21:42

Boundary suggestions

Message from Mark Pumphrey

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

With a garden as described the key is to draw your attention away from the fences. Careful planting on both the right and left boundary will help connect them together. If you repeat the plant selection this all helps to create a link between the two separate boundaries. Without seeing the views it is difficult to understand what you are trying to see. Look to using accent plants to frame the views making the view more important. Vertical trees such as Pyrus Chanticleer work well as they are not wide spreading and will provide flowers as well as great Autumn colour. Tall shrubs that have an open habit such as Tamarisk and the Canadian Lilacs work well. Tall Grasses such as Giant chinese silver grass (Miscanthus floridulus 'Giganteus' ) but be careful as it does spread. Other alternatives could be using bamboos as these will reach can reach 2-3 m height and yet still have an open habit.


Mark Pumphrey MSGD
http://www.broadviewgardendesign.co.uk
http://www.sgd.org.uk

  • Posted: Thu. 4th June 2009 18:28