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Search Results for "Nandina domestica"


Re: Help identifying an existing shrub

Message from Carol

In forum: Identify a plant

is it perhaps Nandina domestica?

  • Posted: Mon. 3rd August 2020 18:44

Re: shrub - red tinge

Message from Nicola

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi again, another suggestion for you "Nandina domestica 'Firepower' which is smaller than Nandina domestica and goes red/orange in winter."

  • Posted: Wed. 28th November 2018 14:07

Re: shrub - red tinge

Message from Bruce Allentuck

In forum: Identify a plant

Nandina domestica 'Nana'

  • Posted: Wed. 28th November 2018 11:44

Re: shrub - red tinge

Message from Nicola

In forum: Identify a plant

Hi Eugene, one follower on our social media thinks this is Nandina domestica. I hope this helps? Cheers, Nicola

  • Posted: Wed. 28th November 2018 10:51

Re: PLEASE HELP CAN YOU IDENTIFY THIS SHRUB

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

nandina domestica, could be 'Moyers red" there are quite a few varieties, some have leaves that turn a lovely red in fall and winter and are dwarf.

  • Posted: Sat. 21st July 2018 02:27

Re: PLEASE HELP CAN YOU IDENTIFY THIS SHRUB

Message from Carol

In forum: Identify a plant

Is it Nandina domestica "Heavenly bamboo"?

  • Posted: Fri. 20th July 2018 22:06

How does Fire Power compare with Moon Bay?

Comment from j

In forum: Nandina domestica 'Fire Power'

How does Nandina domestica 'Fire Power' compare with 'Moon Bay'?

  • Posted: Thu. 29th March 2018 11:02

Re: Help please Re name of two shrubs

Message from ELAINE HUTSON

In forum: Identify a plant

The 1st one is Nandina domestica, lots of different varieties, the 2nd looks like Berberis aurea, when was the picture taken? it is deciduous if it was taken in summer then that is it.

  • Posted: Sun. 19th March 2017 16:10

Re: Identify please

Message from Nicola

In forum: Identify a plant

Another vote for Nandina domestica on Twitter too.

  • Posted: Sat. 3rd May 2014 17:33

Re: Re: Re: Poorly looking container-borne Nandina domestica and yellow-groove bamboo

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

HI, David,
The ants could be undermining the plants if they have an extensive nest in the container. However, ants or no ants, the container is really too small for the plants you have in them. Also, the lack of adequate light and the soil drying out a few times greatly contribute to their failure to thrive. I would suggest getting large pots for each plant and moving them to the spots that get the most sunlight.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Wed. 29th August 2012 15:38

Re: Re: Poorly looking container-borne Nandina domestica and yellow-groove bamboo

Message from Malvern David

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

Hi Kathy, Thanks so much for replying. The container was planted up at the beginning of this summer. They could be crowded but I did build a barrier in the soil between the two plants to stop the bamboo invading. Sun might be an issue, the container sits on a north facing balcony. Watering hasn't been too much of an issue with this year's poor weather but I'm not the most fastidious person in that regard so the soil may have dried out on one or two occasions this year. Do you think i can rule out the ants as the cause of the problem? Many thanks David

  • Posted: Sun. 19th August 2012 10:26

Re: Poorly looking container-borne Nandina domestica and yellow-groove bamboo

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

Hello, David,
My first thought is they look to be crowded. Nandina domestica can get a spread of 1.5m at maturity and the yellow-grooved bamboo has the potential to spread over 10m. They will really want more room to thrive, possibly each given their own large container. How long ago were they planted? How often are they getting watered? The Nandina likes full sun - is it getting enough? If you can rule our pest infestation, I think the next move is to repot/separate, etc.
Kathy C
Kathy C

  • Posted: Sat. 18th August 2012 21:38

Poorly looking container-borne Nandina domestica and yellow-groove bamboo

Question from Malvern David

In forum: Pests, diseases and invasive biosecurity risks

I have two identical wooden planters on our patio. Both have a mixture of Nandina domestica and yellow-groove bamboo plants. The plants in one planter are relatively healthy but the plants in the other look sickly and have experienced mass leave drop (see images - planter in right). The Nandina has gone quite spindly and quite a few branches have become brittle and snap off as if dead. The bamboo still have leaves but these are much less bright green than the same bamboo in the adjacent planter. I cannot see any sign of aphid attack but have found significant numbers of ants in the soil. I believe ants are rarely a problem and more a symptom of something else such as aphids but, as i mentioned, I cant see any aphid attack. Can anyone suggest what might be wrong?

Click images to enlarge

  • Posted: Fri. 17th August 2012 18:15

Re: Re: Evergreen for creating screen on raised decking

Message from Malvern David

In forum: Container gardening

Thanks so much for taking the time to respond to my question. The Nandina domestica looks like a lovely plant and just what we are looking for. We would never have thought of it ourselves so thanks for suggesting it. David

  • Posted: Sun. 29th January 2012 09:44

Re: Evergreen for creating screen on raised decking

Message from Louise Yates M.A.

In forum: Container gardening

Hi- a rather posh specimen for this job, and a bit pricey, but worth it is Nandina domestica, common name Sacred bamboo. It isn't a bamboo, but has a tall elegant shape approx 1.5m, with mid-green compound leaves that tinge red in winter as well as bright red berries in autumn. Good luck!

  • Posted: Sun. 29th January 2012 08:35

Re: Re: Nandina Domestica Needs Help

Message from john hutcheson

In forum: General

Thanks, Kathy. It is in quite a sunny position. Would it be worth cutting it back to promote growth?

  • Posted: Mon. 2nd May 2011 21:02

Re: Nandina Domestica Needs Help

Message from Kathy C

In forum: General

Hi, John,
Nandina domestica is tender in frost so the past three winters have probably weakened it quite a bit. Make sure it. is in a sheltered spot, preferably in full sun. You may want to try lifting it and replanting firmly in the ground. Finally make sure it gets protection from winter frosts/cold winds in autumn.
Kathy C.

  • Posted: Mon. 2nd May 2011 19:57

Nandina Domestica Needs Help

Comment from john hutcheson

In forum: General

I have had a Nandina Domestica in the garden for the past 3 years. I has not done well and the past couple of winters has really taken their toll on the shrub.

I have attached a couple of images and wondered if anyone could suggest any action that I could take to improve the plant.

  • Posted: Mon. 2nd May 2011 11:20

Re: Transplanting Nandina domestica

Message from Kathy C

In forum: Nandina domestica 'Fire Power'

Hi, Claire,
The best time to transplant trees and shrubs is late winter/early spring. Second best time is right now. Since your Nandina is happy and healthy, it is best to take careful steps when tranplanting to keep it that way.
1. Site carefully - make sure where it is going meets its growing/cultural requrements.
2. If possible, tranplant on a cloudy day - this cuts down on root moisture loss.
3. Dig the hole first. The width of the hole should be twice that of the rootball.
4. Don't break up the soil in the bottom of the hole - this prevents sinking which creates air pockets around the roots which can cause rot.
5. Start digging at least 60cm out from the base of the shrub, all along the perimeter. You want to preserve as much root/soil as you can. Heavy job to lift it out, I know but the lease root disturbance is the key. When you do have to cut through roots, make as clean a cut as you can - studies show roots grow back better from straight cuts than ragged ones.
6. Consider using a tarp to place the shrub on once dug out. Then you can slide it to its new location.
7. Once the plant is in its new hole, shovel the soil in. Tamp it down firmly a couple of times as you go to eliminate air pockets.
8 Water in - newly transplanted trees and shrubs need water. If the weather is dry over the next months or so, water well once a week.
I know that is a bit involved, but those steps are the best way to ensure successful transplanting.
Good luck and let me know how you get on.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 14th September 2010 17:21

Transplanting Nandina domestica

Question from Claire Proctor

In forum: Nandina domestica 'Fire Power'

I'd like to move a Nandina domestica within a garden. Soil is light clay, pH 7, aspect sunny, plant in good health and approx 3' wide by 2' high. Has anyone any ideas or success/bad luck tips? Thanks.

  • Posted: Tue. 14th September 2010 07:10