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Search Results for "Primula vulgaris"


This is the continuation of the previous post showing the primula vulagaris error

Comment from Identify a plant

In forum: Identify a plant

I bought 2 pkts of seeds from Chilterns this spring they were primula vulgaris & P. veris. They were sown in sterile pots with sterile compost & covered with plastic as per instruction. Germination was poor the P.vulgaris only 1 seed germinated the veris 3 seeds germinated. As they grew all were obviously not what they were supposed to be. I have been in contact with Chiltern & they plan to replace them but so far cannot identify them. For ease of identifying each plant I have named them cowslip 1, 2 & 3 the other is just primrose. So far only 1 listed as cowslip 1 has blooms they resemble a myosotis but the flowers are such small clusters with each flower being minute. Because I can only post 3 pictures I will send the p.vulgaris separately. . this is listed as primrose.it is now at least 5 times the size shown with a thick centre growth very healthy looking and no evidence of flowers. Thanks Dawn Griffis

  • Posted: Fri. 8th August 2014 15:15

4 plants I need idetifying please

Comment from Identify a plant

In forum: Identify a plant

I bought 2 pkts of seeds from Chilterns this spring they were primula vulgaris & P. veris. They were sown in sterile pots with sterile compost & covered with plastic as per instruction. Germination was poor the P.vulgaris only 1 seed germinated the veris 3 seeds germinated. As they grew all were obviously not what they were supposed to be. I have been in contact with Chiltern & they plan to replace them, but so far cannot identify them. For ease of identifying each plant I have named them cowslip 1, 2 & 3 the other is just primrose. So far only 1 listed as cowslip 1 has blooms, they resemble a myosotis but the flowers are such small clusters with each flower being minute. Because I can only post 3 pictures I will send the p.vulgaris separately. . Thanks dawn Griffis

  • Posted: Fri. 8th August 2014 15:11

Re: Wildflowers

Message from Barry Tabor

In forum: Garden Landscaping and Design Forum Event

Hello, Candy,
I am very surprised that your question has attracted no replies. I do not know if you still need info., after so long a wait, but if so, I would want to suggest that the plants that do best in that situation are the 'woodland edge' species and woodland plants. Probably the hedge is deciduous and you would do well to have early spring plants like primroses and bulbs like bluebells, depending on the aspect. Early plants are going dormant by the time the hedge is casting deep shade and the soil is dried out (as are most woodland floor plants in natural surroundings). If there is sun at the base of your hedge later in the year, Geranium pratense is a handsome, long flowering plant. Some native plants are thugs and will crowd out the smaller more delicate natives, unless they start into growth after your native flowers have begun to die back. Take a look at the listed contents of some commercially available wildflower seed mixtures recommended for woods and woodland edges, pick some you like, check flowering times and sort out which will suit the aspect you have. If you are still in doubt or need more info., please do not hesitate to ask me again, perhaps giving more details of soil, aspect and driness . Good luck - I think not much looks better than a nice display of primroses and English bluebells in early spring, and grasses and geraniums later, but there are native plants to suit all tastes and most situations...... I was once told that Primula vulgaris seed is more valuable, weight for weight than platinum, so do not go ordering an ounce of the seed, which would quite literally contain millions of seeds. If it is a Leylandia hedge, you are banging your head against a brick wall.
Barry

  • Posted: Tue. 9th August 2011 10:21

Primula vulgaris

Comment from Miriam Mesa-Villalba

In forum: Primula vulgaris

The primrose is one the first plants to come into bloom - the name comes from prima rosa meaning ' first rose' - with flowers appearing as early as January in some mild, sheltered locations. It provides an important early nectar source for bees and is particularly attractive to bee flies.

  • Posted: Tue. 16th June 2009 16:54