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Has anyone a suggestion for low growing,ground cover to plant on a south facing bank to stabilise the soil?
This is a recently created bank in a 'blank canvas' garden.

  • Views: 1398
  • Replies: 12
  • Posted: Tue. 1st November 2011 18:29

Re: Ground cover

Reply from Christopher Moss

I am a bit of a novice too but...have you tried Hungarian grazing rye? Although it does grow you can treat it very much like grass - cut it down if you need to. Works well during the winter and helps to improve the soil. Green in colour can get loads of seeds for £2. Google it see what you think.
Keep it in the soil during the winter then dig it over a month before putting other plants in.

  • Posted: Wed. 2nd November 2011 07:53

Re: Re: Ground cover

Reply from Toptaff

Thanks Chris but I'm looking for a suitable perennial to go there.The aforementioned bank is quite steep & not very accessible.

  • Posted: Tue. 8th November 2011 08:56

Re: Ground cover

Reply from Carol

Were you looking for an ornamental? Or something productive? and just one thing to cover the whole area? Sweet woodruff is good (and low), or alpine strawberries, or several of the spreading hardy geraniums (cinerea, Anne Folkard), or lithospermum or hardy pinks. The list is surely quite long! Is it dry? or good and moist? Acidic soil? I just described some of the planting on one of my southfacing banks...

  • Posted: Thu. 3rd November 2011 20:56

Re: Re: Ground cover

Reply from Toptaff

I'm looking for something perennial & decorative,though the most important thing is something 'rooty' to hold the bank together.
There's too many options!I'm spoiled for choice!! I've thought about some cotoneaster horizontalis,or one of the rheums.Soil is clay based & slightly acidic.

  • Posted: Tue. 8th November 2011 08:53

Re: Ground cover

Reply from Robert Kennett - Garden Designer

Try Erigeron karvinskianus. It's very low, its pink to white little daisy flowers bloom on and on well into autumn and it's as easy as pie to grow. Looks fantastic grown en masse. Unbeatable.

  • Posted: Thu. 3rd November 2011 23:35

Re: Ground cover

Reply from Linda Regel

Herbs would be good - thyme, oregano, marjoram, sage - all grow naturally on south facing banks and spread quickly - will look good for a long period, attract insects and you can eat them too!

  • Posted: Fri. 4th November 2011 15:32

Re: Re: Ground cover

Reply from Toptaff

Thanks Linda,but I have lots ofherbs already,in another place.I don't think this bank would suit herbs --to steep & inaccessible really.

  • Posted: Tue. 8th November 2011 08:55

Re: Ground cover

Reply from Kathy C

HI, Toptaff,
Are you in an area with mild or cold winters. I have a very steep, very hot, dry bank that I just planted a year ago. I am in a very mild area so my suggestions might not work for you. Check out the plants below here on Shoot to see if they will work for your slope:
- Erigeron -suggested by another member and that member is absolutely spot on - it is happy with some neglect and so lovely.
- Any low-growing, spreading Ceanothus.
- Myoporum - covers quick but can be borderline to frost tender. This is the one that spread the fastest.
- Oenothera - any of the pink evening primrose can spread rapidly - in the right condition, however, they can be invasive.
- Geranium 'Rozanne' - floriferous and spread it my garden quickly
Hope this is of some use to you.
Kathy C

  • Posted: Tue. 8th November 2011 23:57

Re: Re: Ground cover

Reply from Toptaff

Hi Kathy,

Thanks for your suggestions.

  • Posted: Wed. 9th November 2011 16:09

Re: Ground cover

Reply from ELAINE HUTSON

How about Cotoneaster dammerii, or if you don't mind something deciduous Ceratostigma plumbaginoides, has blue flowers in Sept. and will hold the bank, another one but a little taller is Lonicera pileata, all these don't require too much care, the ceratostigma is slower than the other two.

  • Posted: Wed. 16th November 2011 00:14

Re: Re: Ground cover

Reply from Toptaff

Yes, I've decided to go the low maintenance cotoneaster horizontalis/low juniperus route.

  • Posted: Sun. 27th November 2011 17:02

Re: Ground cover

Reply from eileen whiddett

I;ve got in my garden a very bright yellow strong grass which is evergreen and stunning all the year. Not very high, but I'm going to plant a load of these in a round sloping bed together with a dark red elder - think it's called black lace - I'm hoping that it will curb the couch grass, but I'm blowed if I can remember the name. Any suggestions as to what it might be called. It would seem ideal for the man who's got a sloping garden. Just found out !!! - it's called Acorus

  • Posted: Thu. 12th January 2012 09:47