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Unknown evergreen shrub - assistance required

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Question from Bill Bussone

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Found at new house, growing in Philadelphia area (northern edge of USDA zone 7). Evergreen shrub, approximately 7 ft tall (2 m), perhaps 5 ft wide (1.5 m).

In just under two years, I do not recall it flowering.

Leaves are stiff and somewhat glossy on top, and rougher on bottom. New leaves come in bronze/tan, and somewhat dusty in appearance. Top of leaf turns dark green, whereas underside remains tan, and slightly mottled.

I have not a clue what this is. Ideas?

Unknown evergreen shrub - assistance required (30/04/2013)Unknown evergreen shrub - assistance required (30/04/2013)Unknown evergreen shrub - assistance required (30/04/2013)

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  • Views: 447
  • Replies: 3
  • Posted: Tue. 30th April 2013 21:03

Re: Unknown evergreen shrub - assistance required

Reply from Richard Fenwick

From the photo I think its Elaeagnus x ebbingei 'Coastal Gold' or something very similar.
Hope this helps,
Richard

  • Posted: Tue. 30th April 2013 21:09

Re: Unknown evergreen shrub - assistance required

Reply from ELAINE HUTSON

Eleagnus for sure, common name Russian olive, most of them now are variegated, ebbengei, E. pungens maculata, this one does not look yellow or even the variety called quick silver. It flowers in Oct. with a small sweetly fragrant flower followed by a fruit.

  • Posted: Tue. 30th April 2013 21:26

Re: Re: Unknown evergreen shrub - assistance required

Reply from Bill Bussone

Wow, thanks guys! It certainly seems to be some form of Elaeagnus, although beyond 'not a variegated one', I'm not sure which specific species or cultivar. Umbellata is a nuisance in my area, so it may well be that.

Now I have some concept of how to prune it.

  • Posted: Wed. 1st May 2013 04:35