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Question from Jamie Olney

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Hi,
I am a Newbie to Shoot and Gardening...
Having never previously owned a large garden. It has been a pleasure transforming an overgrown jungle into something that we can sit in and enjoy. Family and friends have been quick to offer advice and recommended plants, but in truth our level of knowledge and understanding is basic. Shoot has helped me overcome some problems, but one continues to persist.
I have an area of garden that I want to improve (please see image below). This thin strip of grass/earth runs parallel to the fence panels and the garden path. Rather than move the garden path to create a larger border I am looking for a plant or hedging that will provide some privacy and be more pleasing to the eye. People have reccomended Bamboo and Ivy, but I feel they might be to difficult to manage?
I know that this species will need to be shade (full to partial) tolerant and will probably need to cling to the fence or be open to regular trimming/cutting back as space to spread is limited. Something that is easy to care for and fast growing would be favourable.
General dimensions are:
- Width 60cm
- Length 300cm
Thank you to anyone who take the time to offer advice and suggestions. Much appreciated. Jamie

Please help...Please help...

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  • Views: 478
  • Replies: 2
  • Posted: Thu. 8th August 2013 10:32

Re: Please help...

Reply from Carol

I'd avoid bamboo because I have seen how some varieties can spread. The clump formers won't necessarily help you in a long thin plot, either. Easy to care for and fast-growing are usually exclusive terms - if it grows fast it will want some maintenance! Some things can be encouraged to cling just to a few wires held in place with pins. I'd be inclined to go for something like Jasminum nudiflorum which is evergereen and has yellow flowers in winter, and mix it up with some climbers like Clematis montana (read around and see if you can find a less vigorous cultivar). I have a clump of Miscanthus zebrinus which is in the kind of conditions you describe and after 3 years has made a good solid clump of robust upright stems with flashes of yellow - it's there most of the year, too. The other thing you could do is widen the path, put down some membrane and gravel and then put pots of interesting things along the fence which you can change about in the year if you feel like it.

  • Posted: Thu. 8th August 2013 10:51

Re: Please help...

Reply from Jane Davis

Hi Jamie - thought I'd replied to this yesterday, but I can't see my reply!! Sorry if this is a bit late but I've only just spotted your question. I suggest you try Euonymus fortunei 'Emerald Gaiety'. It is variegated, green and silver, and will climb if you plant it close to the fence. It will also form a bit of hedge beneath the part that climbs. It is easy to look after, easy to find and hardy. Good luck.

  • Posted: Wed. 23rd October 2013 19:30