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Question from Mrs Caroline Edmunds

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Hi new to site and finding my love of gardening again. I want to try planting to produce a variety of cut flowers in the summer. I am bemused by types and varieties available. Advice please about best varieties to start with? Ease of care? When do I plant? Plug plants or bigger? The site I am looking at is semi shaded north west facing ,low fenced with hedge behind on the site of an old green house. Is this a silly place to try? Maybe lettuce would be better? ! Thanks everyone in anticipation .

  • Views: 870
  • Replies: 8
  • Posted: Mon. 10th March 2014 14:01

Re: Cut flowers

Reply from Muriel

Sarah Raven has loads of lovely suggestions.

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 09:10

Re: Re: Cut flowers

Reply from Mrs Caroline Edmunds

Thank you I saw her books on the internet so will look further at them

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 10:30

Re: Cut flowers

Reply from Julieanne Porter

There is a new book just out 'The Cut Flower patch' - should have lots of inspiration and is aimed to help people grow their own cut flowers

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 09:23

Re: Re: Cut flowers

Reply from Mrs Caroline Edmunds

Thank you I'm so glad you mentioned this book I found it on amazon and thought it looked good and has good reviews

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 10:29

Re: Cut flowers

Reply from Clockhouse Nursery

Dahlias & Chrysanthemums are two old favourites although there are tonnes of plants now considered for 'cut flowers'. Your other answers sound good for inspiration...dont forget google search for 'flower gardening' or 'flower gardening in shade' is free.

Plugs or pots? plugs are cheaper but can have higher failure rate so are best potted on into pots (9cm for example) before planting out. Bigger pots (9cm,1ltr & 3ltr) have great root systems so survival rate is higher but they are generally more expensive to start with.....swings and roundabouts.

Dont forget dahlias are grown from tubers (or roots) which should still be able to get now, and some other annual plants can be grown from seed (cosmos for example).

The plant world in general is a minefield of choice, trial and error is often the route to success.

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 10:00

Re: Re: Cut flowers

Reply from Mrs Caroline Edmunds

This info is all so useful thanks so much

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 10:31

Re: Cut flowers

Reply from Nicola

Mandy (@mandyehearn) on Twitter also suggests:

The Cut flower Patch, by Louise Curley is a lovely book, its the planning of it that's important or theres too much weeding

  • Posted: Tue. 11th March 2014 12:19

Re: Cut flowers

Reply from georgie newbery

It's a great time to start off a cut flower patch now. Either rake the soil in the patch you want to grow on to a fine tilth and direct-sow your seed, or, probably better for the beginner, plant a few seeds in trays and then plant out seedlings when they're big enough. Sweet peas are great for a beginner because they're so fantastic and scented and prolific - quite unlike flowers you can buy from most florists. Plant seeds sparely in peat free compost in deep pots and put somewhere protected from mice as well as frost to germinate. They should poke their heads out of the soil about a week or so from planting. Dig lots of well rotted compost and manure into the place you're going to plant them. Pinch out the tops of the seedlings so that there are only two pairs of true leaves - this way your plants will bush up and you'll get more flowers per plant. Plant your sweet peas out about a foot apart, perhaps around a teepee shaped arrangement of stakes. Water them in well and you should have flowers for the end of June/beginning of July. Good luck!

Re: Cut flowers

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  • Posted: Thu. 13th March 2014 15:52