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Keep off my new plants!

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Question from Kate Sowerby

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I have a new garden to design which is very exciting but I dont know where to start. How do I stop the cattle and sheep in the field nextdoor destroying everything I plant. At the moment there is a simple stock fence to keep them out but that wont stop them munching! An open exposed N. Yorkshire garden with lots of wind whistling down the valley. Any ideas?

Keep off my new plants! (01/09/2011)

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  • Views: 1291
  • Replies: 8
  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 08:59

Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Charlie Maclauchlan

Hi, I was directed to your post by Nicola Gammon, through Linked In. I am the Director of a York based Landscaping company who work throughout Yorkshire and I am sure we could help you out with the problem with the live stock in the next field as well as with the design and construction of your new garden.

Please feel free to give me a call on 07900 193657 and I would be happy to come meet you to talk about the challenges you face, and the possible solutions.

I hope to hear from you soon

Regards

Charlie

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 09:31

Re: Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Nicola

Thanks Charlie - can you offer Kate a free visit and review or are visits & consultantions paid for?

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 09:50

Re: Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Kate Sowerby

Thanks for the offer Charlie. It was mainly planting ideas I was after in the hope there were some plants the cows would leave alone. I might contact you if I get really stuck!

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 17:30

Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Tracey Hutchison

Hi Kate.

My advice would be to plant some tough plants on the boundary, like tamarisk, escallonias, viburnums and some spiky plants like hollys & berberis, to create a wind break.(spikes may discourage the animals) If you have an exposed garden its the wind you need to worry about.Google image for wind breaks. The height of the wind break gives you 20 times the protection horizontally. You could also attach wind mesh to the stock fence, which will offer the plants some protection while they get established.

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 09:43

Re: Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Nicola

Thanks for the advice Tracey! Good planting ideas:) Here are Tamarix, Escallonia and Viburnum in Shoot. Hope this is helpful!

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 09:49

Re: Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Kate Sowerby

Thanks Tracey.
The wind break is a great idea and will help stop the destruction from sheep and wind - thanks. I will look at the plant suggestions as well.

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 17:32

Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Belinda Macdonald, Shades of Green

Hi Kate

Before you plant anything you will need to address the wind problem, as Tracey advised. I would heartily recommend that you find a local garden designer who can come and give you some initial advice on shelterbelt planting and on the types of plants that are likely to survive in your location. I am based in Scotland and so I have lots of experience of the damaging effects of harsh winds, cold wet winters and livestock damage in my clients' gardens and I use a restricted palette of plants in these situations. It is always worth getting some advice at the outset, to help you to avoid expensive mistakes and heartache. Good luck - it looks like a fabulous spot! PS livestock will have a go at most things, even thorny ones so its best to leave a gap between the stock fence and the planting zone.

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 10:06

Re: Re: Keep off my new plants!

Reply from Kate Sowerby

Thanks Belinda.
I will bare in mind the gap idea - thanks. The hard landscaping starts in October so time to work out the planting ideas.

  • Posted: Thu. 1st September 2011 17:35