OK
In progress indicator

Peter Lee's forum posts

Total number of forum posts: 10


Frankenia laevis flowering in July

from Peter

Someone in the Alpine Garden Society has kindly confirmed this is Frankenia laevis.

  • Posted: Mon. 30th July 2018 14:05

Re: Pink alpine flowering in July

from Peter

Leafing through Allan Bloom's Alpine for Your Garden (1980) I came across Frankenia thymifloia (the sea heath) which has a similar form to this plant and is said to flower Jun-Sep. This led me to pink-flowered Frankenia laevis. Please, is anyone familiar with these?

  • Posted: Tue. 24th July 2018 18:33

Pink alpine flowering in July

from Peter

Can anyone please identify this pretty little alpine flowering in full sun in the crevice garden in July when most other alpines have finished? Looking at the leaves I wondered if it is a mossy saxifrage?

  • Posted: Tue. 24th July 2018 11:43
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

Re: Re: Different from a Salvia?

from Peter

Thank you. Teucrium x lucidrys is spot on! For some reason the foliage picture doesn't appear for me so I am reloading it here. Apart from this foliage, the growing conditions are a match. Not a plant that I have been able to grow on clay! Thanks to all of you for your suggestions.

  • Posted: Tue. 24th July 2018 07:37

Different from a Salvia?

from Peter

Clearly a Lamiaceae, I thought that this might be a Salvia microphylla or greggii but the flower form is different. The upper lob is split and narrow with beak-like tips, and the side lobs narrow and extended. It appears unlike any Salvia I can find. Your help would be appreciated.

  • Posted: Sat. 21st July 2018 09:52
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

Probably A. reptans Pink Elf

from Peter

Thanks Jane
Ajuga looks right. I should have noticed it has square stems and therefore in the Mint (Lamiaceae) Family.
However, it's not a typical A. reptans (Common Bugleweed) as this plant is very small (10cm) and is not vigorously spreading (yet). I looked at other species of Ajuga, but none fitted, so I have come to a tentative conclusion that is A. reptans 'Pink Elf', a compact cultivar, with mid pink flowers on 10cm purple stems; leaves deep almost glossy green with broadly rounded teeth.
Thanks again, I would not a got there without your help.
Peter

  • Posted: Wed. 3rd January 2018 13:24

Another alpine puzzle

from Peter

Please help me identifying this little plant emerging from 10mm gravel in mid-April outdoors with spikes of bi-symetrical lilac flowers. Not I think an orchid because of the non-leathery leaves. Not a broomrape because it has leaves! So I don't even know its family!

  • Posted: Tue. 2nd January 2018 12:36
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

Re: Re: Re: Please identify this alpine

from Peter

Bingo, I've found it and it's in Shoot!

It's Anacyclus pyrethrum var. depressus or Flattened Alexander's Foot with greyish leaves pinnately dissected into fine segments, and solitary flowers with white rays, red in bud.

Thanks for your help, Peter

  • Posted: Mon. 1st January 2018 18:37

Re: Re: Re: Please identify this alpine

from Peter

Thanks Carol and Nicola
I've looked at some Erigeons (E.. nana et al) and although they have some red in the flowers the foliage is different.
I am uploading another picture that shows the finely divided green-green leaves. These remind me of a Marguerite (Argyranthemum) but in miniature and the plant appears hardy. Both photos were taken in late-May but in different years.
Thanks, Peter

  • Posted: Mon. 1st January 2018 18:07

Please identify this alpine

from Peter

This grows in the crevice garden at Hockwold. It's clearly in the daisy family, perhaps a chamomile (Anthemis), but I can't find a chamomile with red backed petals. Any ideas please.

  • Posted: Mon. 1st January 2018 13:06
  • Last reply: No timestamp set