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Sandy Rawlins's forum posts

Total number of forum posts: 19


Melianthus major

from Sandy Rawlins

Thanks Melissa

  • Posted: Fri. 5th February 2010 14:54

Melianthus major

from Sandy Rawlins

Thank you. I am a little worried as my moggy will not eat grass at all, but seems to enjoy nibbling away at other foliage, especially the verbena boniarensis and sisyrinchium striatum. I've got some other plants described as 'toxic', such as monkshood, which she seems to leave alone. Fingers crossed then!

  • Posted: Thu. 4th February 2010 17:23

Melianthus major

from Sandy Rawlins

I ahve just bought a melianthus major (honey bush). It sounded just the right architectural plant for a large sun-blessed space at the bottom of my long garden.

I have read somewhere that its foliage is 'toxic' and am worried as I am a cat lover and don't want my feline friends to come to any harm.

Any advice would be welcome.

  • Posted: Tue. 2nd February 2010 20:14
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

Agapanthus

from Sandy Rawlins

Thanks Melissa - I wonder if I should be removing the soggy leaves now, or leave them as a bit of protection?

  • Posted: Sun. 3rd January 2010 13:34

Have I lost my agapanthus?

from Sandy Rawlins

My agapanthus africanus are planted in pots underground in a sheltered part of the garden. Following the recent frosty weather, they are looking decidedly unhappy. Will they survive, or are they a lost cause?

  • Posted: Thu. 31st December 2009 13:11
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

Thanks

from Sandy Rawlins

Thanks, we are nowhere near Buckinghamshire, but thanksfor your offer of help.

  • Posted: Fri. 2nd October 2009 17:37

Tree-felling

from Sandy Rawlins

This winter, we are planning to remove a large weeping willow from our garden. It has become too big for the size of our garden, and has been lopped and 'reshaped' over the years beyond redemption.

Surrounding the willow are a number of shrubs and perennials that we would hate to lose (dogwoods, climbing hydrangea, a clump of stinking hellebores, among others).

Any advice would be welcome about how best to protect them. We are hoping to dig up and put the shrubs etc to one side - would it be best to put them into pots, or can we just wrap up the roots somehow until the time comes to put them back? Help!!

Thanks

  • Posted: Thu. 1st October 2009 23:16
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

climbing hydrangea

from Sandy Rawlins

Thanks for your response. I thionk I have made up my mind - I have a copper beech at the front of my house - it would look good there and has the same orientation etc.

  • Posted: Fri. 14th August 2009 18:48
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

Climbing hydrangea

from Sandy Rawlins

Help! My climbing hydrangea, planted 15 months ago, has put on a real spurt this year and has already flowered. It is now about 4ft up the trunk of a really old willow tree.

Unfortunately, the tree seems to be more dead than alive, and we have decided to have it removed. The tree feller assures us that he can 'dismantle' the tree without disturbing any of the surrounding plants.

I can see that the hydrangea can easily be encouraged to relinquish its grip on the bark, and I understand that I could leave it there and let it become a shrubby mound. Would that look ok? Or would it be best moved to a new location and trained up another host, or wall?

I would really appreciate some advice. Thanks.

  • Posted: Tue. 11th August 2009 16:11
  • Last reply: No timestamp set

Good soil a problem?!

from Sandy Rawlins

Thanks very much. I'll leave it be and see what happens. I am told that we are blessed here with particualrly good soil!! Seems you can't win, but it's fun trying!!.

  • Posted: Tue. 28th July 2009 21:06