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Valerie Munro's forum posts

Total number of forum posts: 139


Re: Re: My Erysimum is wilting?

from Valerie Munro

Hi Patricia

This is all very true, but in view of the recent hot-dry-hot-wet weather that we have had I was going along the obvious route before major surgery! If the re-hydration and de-stressing treatment didn't work, then it was time to dig deeper (literally)

I do agree with your sentiment that if a recently acquired plant has a fundamental problem, then it should be take back to the garden centre lickety split for a refund and they cannot/dare not argue!

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Mon. 5th September 2011 11:52

Re: Re: Identify Please

from Valerie Munro

I would agree - I knew that it had to be a lily from the shape of flowers and stamens, but was foxed at the climbing bit - but you beat me to it as I probably would have got there!

BTW in the great scheme of plants being renamed, Gloriosa superba 'Rothschildiana' is the full name for this glory lily

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Mon. 5th September 2011 11:47

Re: My Erysimum is wilting?

from Valerie Munro

Hi Tanya

Without actually seeing the plant, it is going to be difficult to know exactly what is going on, but I will take a walk through the more obvious and see where that lands us!

I'm afraid that when we buy a plant, we are entirely in the hands of the garden centre/shop/market where it came from for its prior care. When you popped it out of its pot, did you get a good look at the soil ball? If it was very dry and you popped it straight into the ground, then there lies possible solution No.1.

The problem with very dry soil is that it is extremely difficult to re-hydrate it - any water you apply will merely scoot over the surface, find a crack (in this care the gao between its soil ball and the planting hole) and then disappear. This means that any water that you applied post planting will not have hit the spot.

Sticking with this thought, I would like you to try something. Get a bucket/washing up bowl/ fill it with water and to it add around 6 squirts of washing up liquid. Add this soapy mixture around the root area of the plant in measured amounts - avoid the temptation to chuck it on all in one go -- allow the mixture to penetrate the soil before adding the next.

Then, immediately afterwards get a bucket of clean water, and in the same way, add this clean water in measured doses so that all the soapy water is flushed through. You will know that yoiu have done this when the bubbles have disappeared!

Then take one litre of water, to it add 6 teaspoons of ordinary sugar, mix well and apply this to the root area of the plant, also in measured doses. See what happens in the next 24 hours, and then report back!

Good luck

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Sun. 4th September 2011 08:49

Re: Hydrangea both this and other types

from Valerie Munro

Hi Jospehine

There are two main reasons for a non-flowering hydrangea. The first is that you have pruned it rather late in the year, thereby removing the (unseen) flowerbuds for the following year.

The second, and more fundamental cause, is that the plant is running short of the vital nutrient potassium. Many of the garden fertlisers contain an equal ratio of NPK (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium). All pack must display the ratio on the side of the pack and you should be looking at a product that contains almost twice (at least) the amount of potassium as nitrogen.

The one product that I advocate is called Westland 'Nutri' - the nutrient balance is perfect and what's more being a slow release product, one application will last for 6 months - every time the plant is watered or it rains, a little of the nutrient is fed in.

When moving the plant, make sure that you dig the destination hole first, so that when you lift it you can pop it in straight away thereby lessening the risk of roots drying out. I am now putting small amounts of watering retaining crystals in planting holes - a couple of teaspoons well mixed into the bottom soil will suffice.

I hope that this helps
Auntie Planty
@THEauntieplanty on twitter

  • Posted: Wed. 31st August 2011 07:58

Re: Venus fly trap plant

from Valerie Munro

Hi Gill

The best place for you to keep your Venus Flytrap is on a sunny windowsill - the plant does need at least 6 hours of strong sunlight per day to keep in in good shape Also, do not water it with tap water - you will need to collect rain water specifically for this.

You can reduce the amount of water that you give it during its winter dormancy. The plant might drop its leaves, and this is when you should move it to a cooler place to keep it below 8C for about 3 months. In spring, you can bring it back to its sunny spot and stand the pot in 2cm of rain water, which will kick start into producing new leaves and traps.

As for feeding it, just allow nature to do the trick - the trap will need about 3 insects a week to keep in well fed. Please do not try and give it anything that we might eat - definitely no meat from the kitchen!

I hope that this helps. Good luck - they are fascinating plants!
Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Sun. 28th August 2011 22:39

Re: Can anybody ID this plant please?

from Valerie Munro

Hi Jeremy

Could you post a pic of the mystery plant - then we can attempt to give it its proper name!

Auntie Planty

  • Posted: Sun. 28th August 2011 22:25

Re: Hebe Lady Ann

from Valerie Munro

Hi Catherine

Can you send a photo of the plant - one showing the whole plant, the another close up of one leaf and stem

That will make it easier to try and get to the bottom of the problem for you!@

Talk soon

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Wed. 17th August 2011 08:33

Re: Re: And this is????

from Valerie Munro

Hi Jill

I'm with you - also known an Himalayan honeysuckle. This is one plant that can appear courtesy of a by-passing bird - not that I'd be ungrateful, quite nice looking!

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Mon. 15th August 2011 17:19

Re: Acer rubrum

from Valerie Munro

Hi Ian

Acers do like to be in moist but well drained soil so I'm not sure how 'wet' your wetlands are.

There are not many plants that will tolerate having their roots permanently in water - if you are looking for one for a river bank then alders do well, willows are well known for their liking of water and of course the daddy of them all is the swamp cupress (Taxodium distichum). It's this latter plant that puts up little snorkle structures called knees for its root system to get its oxygen.

Acers also like to be in a reasonably sheltered position as winds can be more damaging to their leaves than direct sunlight. I'm not sure that the squirrels would be very interested as their diet contains more nuts than anything else.

I hope that this information helps

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Mon. 15th August 2011 11:34

Re: Colour of new shoots

from Valerie Munro

Hi Michael

Your plant could be reverting. What is happening - 2 plants in the same genus with different qualities (say, variegated leaves in one and nice compact habit in the other) have been crossed to make this particular cultivar of eleagnus.

However, the marriage is not entirely stable, and a plant can start to revert to one of the 'parent' crosses which is what appears to be happening here. You can look at the new leaves very carefully, and if there is a vague hint of some pattern on them, then perhaps they are just taking their time to show off their variegation.

We know that all green leaves grow much more vigorously than variegated plants, and so if you do nothing at all, in time the plant will turn back to being all green.

If you are sure that these leaves are all green, you should follow the all green stems back to where they join a variegated stem, and cut it/them cleanly off.

With luck you will remain in control of the problem

Good luck

Auntie Planty
www.auntieplanty.co.uk

  • Posted: Mon. 15th August 2011 11:29